Health Reform

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The ACA and People with HIV: Profiles from the Field

New in-depth profiles of 12 people with HIV highlight how the Affordable Care Act’s coverage expansions impacted their access to coverage and care. While some experienced serious bumps along the way, those who gained coverage through Medicaid and the Marketplaces were largely able to meet both their HIV and non-HIV care…

Data Note: Predictors Of Positive And Negative Attitudes Towards The ACA Among Non-Group Insurance Enrollees

One of the groups perhaps most affected by changes brought about by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are people who purchase their own health insurance in the non-group market. In this Data Note, we examine data from the Kaiser Family Foundation Wave 2 Survey of Non-Group Health Insurance Enrollees to explore the characteristics of non-group enrollees that are associated with positive and negative attitudes towards the ACA, including feeling personally benefited or negatively affected by the law.

Private Insurance Coverage of Contraception

Insurance coverage of contraceptive services has been the focus of policy attention by state and federal policymakers, as well as in the courts, over the past two decades. This issue brief explains the rules for private insurance coverage of contraceptives at the federal and state level and discusses key issues regarding the provision and coverage of contraception by private insurance plans, including the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

What a Break in the Obamacare Battles Could Bring

Following the Supreme Court’s King v. Burwell decision, the Affordable Care Act could use a break from the intense political heat, though it may not get a long one as the 2016 election season heats up and presidential candidates play to their bases on health care, writes Drew Altman in…

Health and Access to Care and Coverage for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Individuals in the U.S.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals often face challenges and barriers to accessing needed health services and, as a result, can experience worse health outcomes. These challenges can include stigma, discrimination, violence, and rejection by families and communities, as well as other barriers, such as inequality in the workplace and health insurance sectors, the provision of substandard care, and outright denial of care because of an individual’s sexual orientation or gender identity. This issue brief examines population characteristics of the LGBT community and the impacts of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Supreme Court rulings and other policy changes related to same-sex marriage that can insurance coverage and access to health care services, and recent actions by the Trump Administration.

The Connection Between Health Coverage and Income Security

Using data from a new Kaiser Family Foundation panel survey following the uninsured in California who gained coverage since 2010, Drew Altman’s latest column in The Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank shows how expanding health coverage and improving economic security for working Americans are connected even though they are often part…

Women’s Health Issues Journal: Medicaid and Women’s Health Coverage Two Years into the Affordable Care Act

As Medicaid marks its 50th year, the program has unquestionably become the mainstay of health coverage for low-income women in the nation. Since its inception, its role for women has continued to evolve and expand, but the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) swung open the doors for Medicaid to serve even more low-income women who lack access to private or employer-based insurance. This is because the ACA enabled states to finally eliminate Medicaid’s historical “categorical” requirements, which had essentially shut out women and men without dependent children.

JAMA Forum: Why the Ruckus Over the Cadillac Plan Tax?

Larry Levitt’s October 2015 post explains the terms of the much-debated Cadillac plan tax, how it is designed to reduce health costs, and how it could end up shifting more costs to workers.