Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues

Pledging Conference Raises $2.6B For Humanitarian Efforts In Yemen; More Than Half Of Funding From Countries Involved In War

The Guardian: More than half of $2.6bn aid to Yemen pledged by countries involved in war
“More than half of $2.6bn (£1.9bn) in donations made at a special one-day conference to ease the humanitarian crisis in Yemen were pledged by countries that are either fighting in the civil war or selling arms to those undertaking the fighting. The U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres nevertheless hailed the money raised and the news that talks had led to the U.N. finally gaining access to a grains facility near Hodeidah port that contains enough supplies to feed more than 3m people for a month…” (Wintour, 2/26).

New York Times: U.N. Seeks $4 Billion to Save Millions from Famine in Yemen
“…Access to the warehouse, the Red Sea Mills near the port of Hudaydah, where 51,000 tons of grain had been stranded since September, came as the United Nations appealed for [more than] $4 billion from international donors to save millions in Yemen from starvation. Officials with the World Food Programme, the United Nations anti-hunger agency, crossed the front line to enter the Red Sea Mills and inspect the grain, finding it largely intact. The mission eased fears that the stockpile, which could feed 3.7 million people for a month, could spoil and go to waste…” (Walsh/Cumming-Bruce, 2/26).

U.N. News: With 10 million Yemenis ‘one step away from famine,’ donors pledge $2.6 billion
“…Highlighting the impact on the youngest Yemenis, the U.N. chief noted that ‘children did not start the war in Yemen, but they are paying the highest price. Some 360,000 children are suffering from severe acute malnutrition, fighting for their lives every day. One credible report puts the number of children under-five who have died of starvation, at more than 80,000.’ Conference co-host Sweden’s Foreign Minister Margaret Walstrom described a similarly dire situation in the country, which was already one of the poorest in the world before violence cut desperately needed imports of food, fuel, and medicine…’ (2/26).

Additional coverage of humanitarian efforts in Yemen is available from Agence France-Presse, Al Jazeera, and IRIN.