Global Financing for Malaria: Trends & Future Status

Executive Summary
  1. WHO. World Malaria Report 2013, December 2013.

    ← Return to text

  2. WHO, Fifty-Eighth World Health Assembly: Resolutions and Decisions Annex, May 2005.

    ← Return to text

  3. Roll Back Malaria, The Global Malaria Action Plan: For a malaria-free world, September 2008.

    ← Return to text

  4. Roll Back Malaria, Refined/Updated GMAP Objectives, Targets, Milestones and Priorities Beyond 2011, June 2011.

    ← Return to text

  5. Roll Back Malaria, The Global Malaria Action Plan: For a malaria-free world, September 2008.

    ← Return to text

  6. Roll Back Malaria, The Second Global Malaria Action Plan (GMAP2), (see: http://www.gmap2.org/english/home).

    ← Return to text

  7. WHO, Global technical strategy for malaria (2016-2030), (see: http://www.who.int/malaria/areas/global_technical_strategy/en/).

    ← Return to text

Introduction
  1. WHO. World Malaria Report 2013, December 2013.

    ← Return to text

  2. WHO, Fifty-Eighth World Health Assembly: Resolutions and Decisions Annex, May 2005.

    ← Return to text

  3. Roll Back Malaria, The Global Malaria Action Plan: For a malaria-free world, September 2008.

    ← Return to text

  4. Roll Back Malaria, Refined/Updated GMAP Objectives, Targets, Milestones and Priorities Beyond 2011, June 2011.

    ← Return to text

  5. Roll Back Malaria, The Global Malaria Action Plan: For a malaria-free world, September 2008.

    ← Return to text

  6. Roll Back Malaria, The Global Malaria Action Plan: For a malaria-free world, September 2008.

    ← Return to text

  7. Roll Back Malaria, The Second Global Malaria Action Plan (GMAP2), (see: http://www.gmap2.org/english/home).

    ← Return to text

  8. WHO, Global technical strategy for malaria (2016-2030), (see: http://www.who.int/malaria/areas/global_technical_strategy/en/).

    ← Return to text

Findings
  1. The U.S. is also the single largest donor to the Global Fund, but contributions to the Global Fund are in turn used by the Global Fund to support HIV, TB, and malaria efforts. U.S. funding totals for malaria, therefore, do not include contributions to the Global Fund. See Methodology for additional information.

    ← Return to text

  2. Decreased funding in 2011 was primarily due to a decline in disbursements from the Global Fund.

    ← Return to text

  3. The U.K. reported malaria funding to the OECD DAC for the first time in 2007.

    ← Return to text

  4. Malaria R&D funding data are presented in nominal dollars and were obtained from Policy Cures through a special data request. Data presented in Policy Cures’ G-FINDER Report and online database are in real dollars and therefore, will not match data presented in this report.

    ← Return to text

  5. Roll Back Malaria, The Global Malaria Action Plan: For a malaria-free world, September 2008.

    ← Return to text

  6. These figures are based on Global Fund planned allocations but actual disbursement rates may vary and are also dependent on recipient country allocation decisions. For example, as of December 4, the Global Fund had disbursed US$714 million for malaria efforts for the year, below the planning annual average of $1.4 billion.

    ← Return to text

  7. For the U.S., 2014 amounts are final funding levels, 2015 is based on the President’s Budget Request, and 2016 assumes the same level of funding as 2015.

    ← Return to text

  8. WHO, World Malaria Report 2014, December 2014.

    ← Return to text

  9. United Nations, Resolution adopted by the General Assembly: 2626 (XXV). International Development Strategy for the Second United Nations Development Decade, October 1970.

    ← Return to text

Conclusion
  1. Roll Back Malaria, The Global Malaria Action Plan: For a malaria-free world, September 2008.

    ← Return to text

Methodology
  1. WHO, World Malaria Report 2014, December 2014.

    ← Return to text

  2. U.K. National Audit Office, Department of International Development, July 2013.

    ← Return to text

  3. Policy Cures, Neglected disease research and development: Emerging trends, December 2014.

    ← Return to text