Health Aid Disbursement Generally Cost-Effective But Not Always Optimal, Study Shows

Health Affairs: Health Aid Is Allocated Efficiently, But Not Optimally: Insights From A Review Of Cost-Effectiveness Studies
Eran Bendavid, assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University, and colleagues “reviewed the literature for cost-effectiveness of interventions targeting five disease categories: HIV; malaria; tuberculosis; noncommunicable diseases; and maternal, newborn, and child health. We measured the alignment between health aid and cost-effectiveness, and we examined the possibility of better alignment by simulating health aid reallocation. … We conclude that health aid is generally aligned with cost-effectiveness considerations, but in some countries this alignment could be improved” (July 2015).