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Foreign NGO Engagement in U.S. Global Health Efforts: Foreign NGOs Receiving USG Support Through USAID

Executive Summary
  1. Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), NGO Engagement in U.S. Global Health Efforts: Analysis of U.S.-Based NGOs Receiving USG Support Through USAID, Dec. 2014.

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  2. Based on KFF analysis of data from the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard website, ForeignAssistance.gov.

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  3. KFF analysis of USAID FY2013 transaction data, downloaded 10-10-2014 through the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard website, ForeignAssistance.gov, as well as information from NGO websites.

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  4. Pandemic Influenza and Other Emerging Threats includes efforts to mitigate the possibility that a highly virulent virus could develop into a pandemic by strengthening targeted countries’ ability to detect cases early and to apply appropriate control measures quickly. According to USAID congressional budget justifications, http://www.usaid.gov/results-and-data/budget-spending/congressional-budget-justification.

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  5. Other Public Health Threats also addresses dangers posed by infectious diseases not included elsewhere, such as cholera, dengue, and meningitis; significant non-communicable health threats of major public health importance; the containment of antimicrobial resistance; and the crosscutting work on surveillance that builds capacity for outbreak preparedness and response. According to USAID congressional budget justifications, http://www.usaid.gov/results-and-data/budget-spending/congressional-budget-justification.

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Report
  1. KFF, NGO Engagement in U.S. Global Health Efforts: Analysis of U.S.-Based NGOs Receiving USG Support Through USAID, Dec. 2014.

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  2. For example, USAID transaction data analyzed for this report include funds transferred from the Department of State to USAID for HIV efforts, which were then obligated and eventually disbursed to foreign NGOs.

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  3. Based on KFF analysis of data from the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard website, ForeignAssistance.gov. This analysis does not include funding directly disbursed to foreign NGOs by other USG agencies.

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  4. Downloaded 10-10-2014 through the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard website, ForeignAssistance.gov.

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  5. PVOs are a subset of the wider NGO community and “are tax-exempt nonprofits that leverage their expertise and private funding to address development challenges abroad [outside the U.S.].” USAID, “PVO Registration,” webpage, http://www.usaid.gov/pvo.

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  6. TASO website, http://www.tasouganda.org/; RACHA website, http://www.racha.org.kh/; Caritas Rwanda website, http://www.caritasrwanda.org/index.php/en/.

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  7. The 24 faith-based NGOs are: African Enterprise International, Caritas Rwanda, Caritas Senegal, Catholic AIDS Action, CCAP Nkhoma Synod Relief and Development, Christian Health Association of Nigeria, Christian Health Association of Malawi, Christian Social Social Service Commission, Church Alliance for Orphans, Fondazione AVSI, Fundacion PRODEIN, GECHAAN, Inter-Religious Council of Uganda, Kigezi Diocese Water and Sanitation Project, LKNU, Life in Abundance, Mildmay, Partners in Hope, PASADA, Lifeskills Promoters, Retrak, Roman Catholic Diocese of Timika, Tshwane Leadership Foundation, and YWCA of Nigeria. It is important to note, however, that other organizations may identify as secular but have religious principles undergirding their work. For example, the work of the Joint Medical Store, which was established as a joint venture between the Uganda Catholic Medical Bureau and the Uganda Protestant Medical Bureau; see http://www.jms.co.urg.

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  8. LKNU website, http://www.lknu.org/; MSH, “Commitment to and passion for early childhood development in Namibia: three remarkable ECD centers,” short story, April 2014.

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  9. About 37% of total global health funding disbursed by USAID that year was directed to more than 130 U.S.-based NGOs. See KFF, NGO Engagement in U.S. Global Health Efforts: Analysis of U.S.-Based NGOs Receiving USG Support Through USAID, Dec. 2014.

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  10. The other relevant bureaus are: Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean; Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan Affairs; Bureau for the Middle East; Bureau for Economic Growth, Education and Environment (previously known as the Bureau for Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade (EGAT)); and U.S. Global Development Lab (incorporates the former Office of Innovation and Development Alliances (IDEA) and Office of Development Partners (ODP)); and Bureau for Europe and Eurasia. Additionally, a very small amount of funding was designated for the “Recovery” organizational unit.

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  11. Pandemic Influenza and Other Emerging Threats includes efforts to mitigate the possibility that a highly virulent virus could develop into a pandemic by strengthening targeted countries’ ability to detect cases early and to apply appropriate control measures quickly. According to USAID congressional budget justifications,http://www.usaid.gov/results-and-data/budget-spending/congressional-budget-justification.

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  12. Other Public Health Threats also addresses dangers posed by infectious diseases not included elsewhere, such as cholera, dengue, and meningitis; significant non-communicable health threats of major public health importance; the containment of antimicrobial resistance; and the crosscutting work on surveillance that builds capacity for outbreak preparedness and response. According to USAID congressional budget justifications, http://www.usaid.gov/results-and-data/budget-spending/congressional-budget-justification.

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  13. In the transaction data, the USG designated the “benefitting location” for this funding as “worldwide.”

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  14. In addition to “worldwide” support, regions/sub-regions mentioned in the data included: Africa, East Africa, South Africa, Caribbean, East Asia, and the Middle East.

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  15. In addition to the countries listed below, other countries may have been reached through regional efforts. Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brazil, Cambodia, Cote d'Ivoire, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Moldova, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

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Appendices
  1. Downloaded 10-10-2014 through the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard website, ForeignAssistance.gov.

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  2. For example, USAID transaction data analyzed for this report include funds transferred from the Department of State to USAID for HIV efforts, which were then obligated and eventually disbursed to foreign NGOs.

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  3. Based on KFF analysis of data from the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard website, ForeignAssistance.gov.

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  4. Positive and negative disbursements along with zero-dollar disbursements that are no-cost extensions are each closely linked to the recent completion or ongoing execution of global health activities, providing the best approximation available for showing where work is being done.

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  5. KFF analysis of USAID FY2013 transaction data, downloaded 10-10-2014 through the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard website, ForeignAssistance.gov, as well as information from NGO websites.

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  6. KFF analysis of USAID FY2013 transaction data, downloaded 10-10-2014 through the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard website, ForeignAssistance.gov.

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