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U.S. Should Develop Strategy To Guide Biological Technology Research Efforts

Foreign Policy: Zika Is Just the First Front in the 21st-Century Biowar
James Stavridis, dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University

“…The United States needs to continue its research efforts [in biological technology], but, equally important, it needs to develop a coherent and cohesive biological strategy to guide those efforts. … There are three key components to preparing for the biological revolution. First, we need an international approach that seeks to limit the proliferation of highly dangerous technologies … and fosters cooperation in the case of contagion or a transnational biological threat. … Second, the American government’s interagency process must become more adept at addressing both the scientific advances and the security challenges emanating from the world of biological research. … Finally, all this will require a powerful level of private-public cooperation. … As citizens, both in the United States and globally, we spend far too much time focused on information and cyber-technologies. The weaponization of biology is coming, and coming quickly. And our ability to control that process — or not — will determine our destiny” (8/24).