U.S. Military Provides Medical Care, Education Services To Women, Children In Tanzania

The U.S. Army news service reports on a five-day Medical Civil Action Program, or MEDCAP, in Tanzania, during which “Tanzanian medical providers working in partnership with U.S. service members from Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa provided medical care to more than 2,100 Tanzanian women and children.” According to the news service, “The program supported the Tanzanian Health Initiative, a program that seeks to provide a comprehensive approach to health for the Tanzanian people and parallels the U.S. government’s Global Health Initiative.”

“During the program, women of childbearing age and children under five years old received a preventive health educational briefing, a consultation with a doctor and medication if necessary,” as well as information on topics such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and “preventive medicine measures for food and waterborne illnesses,” the U.S. Army writes (Linch, 1/22).

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