Media Outlets Report On Coronavirus Response Leadership Globally, Include Interviews With U.N., CDC Officials

AP: U.N. chief: New virus outbreak is ‘a very dangerous situation’
“The U.N. secretary general said Tuesday that the virus outbreak that began in China poses ‘a very dangerous situation’ for the world, but ‘is not out of control.’ Speaking in an interview with The Associated Press, Antonio Guterres said that ‘the risks are enormous and we need to be prepared worldwide for that.’ Guterres said his greatest worry was a spread of the virus to areas with ‘less capacity in their health service,’ particularly some African countries. The World Health Organization is looking into how to help handle such a development, he added…” (Gannon, 2/18).

New York Times: How to Stop a Disease From Crossing Borders
“In nearly 20 years with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Rear Adm. Nancy Knight, director of the agency’s global health protection division, has led the development, coordination, and implementation of public health policies and programs in countries including Nigeria, Kenya, and South Africa. … Dr. Knight talked about the coronavirus, what travelers can do to avoid it, and how the CDC works with governments and other groups around the world to help countries stay prepared for the possibility of an outbreak of a contagious disease, and to tackle those diseases when they occur…” (Mzezewa, 2/17).

STAT: The global responders: Who is leading the charge against the coronavirus outbreak
“As concerns mount over the coronavirus that first emerged in China, public health officials there and around the globe have launched a massive response. The nature of that response has varied. In China, officials are trying to contain the virus. In countries that have seen local transmission, including Germany and Singapore, the goal has been to stamp out flare-ups. And in much of the world that hasn’t yet seen much spread of the virus yet, public health officials are readying a strategy in case they do. So who’s leading the charge? What follows is a list of some of the most important players, from a handful of the agencies involved. The list is hardly comprehensive. And selection is not meant to amplify these people’s importance over that of others. In fact, some of the most vital responders do not appear here: the countless frontline health care workers who are trying to save lives and prevent new cases, all while putting their own safety on the line…” (Joseph/Branswell, 2/17).