Federal and state laws, as well as insurers’ coverage policies, shape the extent to which women can have coverage for abortion services under both publicly funded programs and private plans. Women who seek an abortion, but do not have coverage for the service, shoulder the out-of-pocket costs of the services.
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Abortion Coverage in the ACA Marketplace Plans: The Impact of Proposed Rules for Consumers, Insurers and Regulators

On November 7, 2018, a day after the 2018 midterm elections, the Trump Administration issued a proposed regulation to address “Exchange Program Integrity.” A major element of this proposed rule would affect insurers, consumers, and state insurance regulators in the states that either allow or require abortion coverage. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) allows states to ban plans from offering abortion as a benefit on their Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) and requires plans that cover abortion to segregate policyholder payments for abortion coverage from all other premium charges. This brief provides an overview of current ACA-related abortion coverage policies and analyzes the potential impact of the proposed changes.

Intersection of State Abortion Policy and Clinical Practice, 2019

While abortion services are regulated by the same laws and policies that govern other medical services, many states have enacted abortion-specific regulations that can limit women’s access to abortion services and jeopardize the quality of care.

The Hyde Amendment and Coverage for Abortion Services

This brief details the federal programs affected by the Hyde Amendment, provides estimates on the share of women insured by Medicaid affected by the law, reviews the impact of the law on their access to abortion services, and discusses the potential effect if the law were to be repealed.

Statutory Requirements & Policies Governing U.S. Global Family Planning and Reproductive Health Efforts

This issue brief provides a summary of the major policies and statutory requirements governing U.S. participation in international family planning and reproductive health efforts. These laws and policies collectively direct how funds are spent, which organizations receive funds and generally shape U.S. family planning and reproductive health activities around the world.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll — May 2012

The May Health Tracking Poll focuses on the public’s perceptions and reactions to women’s reproductive health reemerging as a heated issue in policy debates and news and its potential impact on the upcoming presidential election. Three in ten women (31 percent) overall believe that there is currently a “wide-scale effort…

State Profiles for Women’s Health

This interactive tool provides state profiles on women’s health and access to care. Browse the map and click on a state to view a women’s health data dashboard in each of the four categories: demographics, health insurance coverage and access, sexual health, and pregnancy.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: March 2016

The March Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that health care is one of many issues that will be important to voters in the Presidential election, trailing concerns about the economy and jobs but leading concerns about immigration. Health care ranks higher for Democratic voters than for Republican and independent voters and is a higher priority for women than for men. Health care costs remain on the forefront of the minds of both the uninsured and voters, with nearly half of uninsured Americans saying that cost is the main reason they haven’t gotten health insurance and voters mentioning cost when asked what specifically about health care will affect their presidential vote. In light of the two women’s health cases before the Supreme Court, this month’s survey examines how the public, and women specifically, feel about the state of women’s reproductive health policy. About one-third of Americans say ‘there is a wide-scale effort to limit women’s reproductive health choices and services, such as abortion, family planning, and contraception’ and a majority of Democratic voters name Hillary Clinton as the candidate for president they trust to represent their view of women’s reproductive health choices and services, while Republican voters don’t coalesce around any one candidate.