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Women Outlive Men Worldwide, WHO Report Shows, Calls For Greater Access To Maternal Health Services, Primary Health Care

The BMJ: WHO report shows that women outlive men worldwide
“Women outlive men everywhere in the world, and the gap in life expectancy would be even wider if women in low-income countries had better access to health care, a new global report shows. The World Health Organization’s World Health Statistics Overview 2019 — broken down by sex for the first time — shows that when facing the same disease, men seek health care less than women…” (Thornton, 4/5).

The Telegraph: New figures reveal the weaker sex — why men die younger than women
“…The main causes of death that contribute to a lower life expectancy in men are heart disease, road injuries, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and stroke. Global suicide mortality rates were 75 percent higher in men than in women in 2016. … In lower income countries, the smaller difference in life expectancy between men and women is mainly due to higher rates of maternal mortality — in low-income countries one in 41 women dies in pregnancy or childbirth, compared to one in 3,300 in high-income countries…” (Gulland/Newey, 4/4).

U.N. News: Women outliving men ‘everywhere,’ new U.N. health agency statistics report shows
“…This finding also tallies with the report’s insistence that in almost all developing countries, there are fewer than four nurses and midwives per 1,000 people, and that life expectancy is strongly affected by income. This is clearest in low-income countries, where people live on average 18.1 years less than in high-income countries, and where one child in every 14 will die before their fifth birthday…” (4/4).

VOA News: Why Women Live Longer Than Men
“…[Samira Asma, WHO assistant director general for data, analytics and delivery,] says noncommunicable diseases are on the rise in most of the low- and middle-income countries, especially in Africa. She tells VOA this is due to the emergence of risk factors such as tobacco use, increase in alcohol consumption, and unhealthy diets. … Asma says statistics on NCD-related deaths underscore the need to prioritize primary health care…” (Schlein, 4/4).