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U.N. Staff Members, Aid Workers Among 157 Killed In Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 Crash

Devex: In Nairobi, aid community struggles in wake of ET302 crash
“In the United Nations’ Nairobi complex in Kenya, which houses several agencies, the mood has been subdued since the shocking news that 157 people were killed in the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash on Sunday morning. … At least 45 aid professionals and those working for international organizations are believed to have been on the flight, including nine from the African Union, seven from the World Food Programme, and six from the U.N. Office at Nairobi, or UNON…” (Sampathkumar, 3/12).

New York Times: Victims of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 Came From at Least 30 Nations
“…On Sunday, when Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 plummeted to the ground shortly after takeoff, killing more than 150 people, the plane had a particularly high concentration of United Nations employees: At least 22 staff members died in the crash, a United Nations official said on Monday. The airline said the flight had passengers from at least 30 countries, some of whom were aid workers for other humanitarian organizations…” (Jacobs/Searcey, 3/10).

Wall Street Journal: U.N. Remembers Victims of Ethiopian Airlines Crash
“…Ten U.N. agencies lost employees on flight 302, which crashed shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa en route to Nairobi, killing all 157 aboard. … The deaths of the aid workers — who included Europeans, Asians, and Africans — underscored the inherent risks faced by many U.N. personnel who travel the world for investigations that subject them to dangers from disease, terrorist attacks, and travel accidents…” (Fassihi/Legorano, 3/11).

Washington Post: ‘In deep grief’: Aid workers, U.N. staff, tourists among victims in Ethiopia plane crash
“…The Rome-based World Food Programme, which provides food assistance to millions of people across the world and in the Horn of Africa, lost seven employees. David Beasely, the agency’s executive director, said the loss was ‘devastating, heartbreaking. I don’t think there was a dry eye today in our team in Addis’…” (Schemm et al., 3/11).