Persistent Vaccine Myths

With news that the country has now vaccinated half of its population with at least one dose, This Drew Altman Axios column highlights the persistent COVID-19 vaccine myths that are believed by a substantial portion of the unvaccinated population and discusses the options to address vaccine misinformation.

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We aren’t getting a national vaccine ‘passport.’ So let’s use the next best thing: CDC vaccination cards.

In this op-ed for The Washington Post, Drew Altman suggests a way out of the heated debate about a COVID-19 vaccination passport to help provide clarity about who is vaccinated and who still ought to wear masks in public spaces or the workplace by using something that already exists– CDC vaccination cards.

Op-Ed Read Post

Corporate Leaders Are Getting Bullish On Government Action On Health Care Costs

In this Axios column, Drew Altman explores whether the long struggle with rising health costs has caused the tide to turn in corporate leaders’ attitudes towards government involvement in controlling health spending and whether it is part of a larger shift in comfort with government action to solve problems.

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Why Doctors and Nurses Can Be Vital Vaccine Messengers

In this Axios column, Drew Altman examines why doctors and nurses are such critical messengers in the effort to build vaccine confidence.

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President’s Message

Explaining KFF Drew E. Altman, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer. Updated: April 2021 Follow Dr. Altman on Twitter: @DrewAltman This essay discusses the choices we have made about our mission and operating style. Of course, I believe deeply in what we are doing at KFF, but I offer this with…

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Dysfunctional websites are making it harder for Americans to get vaccinated. Here’s how to fix that.

In an op-ed for The Washington Post, Drew Altman spells out how COVID-19 vaccination can be simplified to ensure that the public’s rising confidence in the vaccine isn’t thwarted by frustrating and sometimes dysfunctional websites.

Op-Ed Read Post
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                    [post_content] => A shorter version of this column has been published by Axios.

Big myths about COVID vaccines are showing real staying power among Americans who are not vaccinated. They are not the only factor fueling vaccine hesitancy, but they are a continuing problem the media, health leaders and trusted messengers ought to be able to chip away at to get more people vaccinated.

With social media rife with misinformation, large shares of unvaccinated Americans have latched on to misbeliefs about the vaccines.

One big myth with legs is that the vaccines themselves cause COVID. 36% of unvaccinated adults either believe this or are not sure, and 41% of unvaccinated Blacks do.

Another myth is that the vaccines cause infertility. 29% of unvaccinated adults believe that or don’t know, as do 31% of Republicans. 34% of Republicans also say the vaccines contain fetal cells or are not sure if they do.

About the same shares of unvaccinated adults believe the vaccines change your DNA and that you should not get vaccinated if you have had COVID.

All told 67% of unvaccinated adults cling to one of the major myths about vaccines we asked about in our KFF Vaccine Monitor.

A significant misconception among unvaccinated Latinos is that getting vaccinated will cost them money, with 52% believing it will. Practical obstacles to vaccination such as this or worries that they will not be able to get time off from work to get their shots or deal with side effects weigh heavily on unvaccinated Latinos, many of whom want to get vaccinated.

Unvaccinated adults don’t all get their information from social media. Their top sources of information on vaccines are cable tv, network and local tv news, and friends and family. But their misconceptions could still mostly be coming from social media, which is a top information source on vaccines for 18-29 year olds.

Leaders from President Biden on down can keep hammering away at the facts. So can the media. That should help dispel myths even as trust in government and media has declined. The persistence of vaccine myths also underscore the need to do a better job policing misinformation about vaccines on social media that affect life and death decisions.

One big opportunity jumps out. Doctors, nurses, community health workers and pharmacists are both important sources of information for unvaccinated Americans and trusted messengers. They have a special role to play in their communities clearing up the myths about vaccines that remain among the most hesitant groups.
                    [post_title] => Persistent Vaccine Myths
                    [post_excerpt] => With news that the country has now vaccinated half of its population with at least one dose, This Drew Altman Axios column highlights the persistent COVID-19 vaccine myths that are believed by a substantial portion of the unvaccinated population and discusses the options to address vaccine misinformation.
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In an op-ed for The Washington Post, Drew Altman suggests a way out of the heated debate about a COVID-19 vaccination passport to help provide clarity about who is vaccinated and who still ought to wear masks in public spaces or the workplace by using something that already exists-- CDC vaccination cards. He writes, “the idea of vaccine passports has been discarded prematurely here. Using the CDC vaccination cards is far better than doing nothing, which leaves unclear who can safely go unmasked. This is the most feasible option, and it can be put into widespread use without any government requirements."
[post_title] => We aren’t getting a national vaccine ‘passport.’ So let’s use the next best thing: CDC vaccination cards. [post_excerpt] => In this op-ed for The Washington Post, Drew Altman suggests a way out of the heated debate about a COVID-19 vaccination passport to help provide clarity about who is vaccinated and who still ought to wear masks in public spaces or the workplace by using something that already exists-- CDC vaccination cards. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => we-arent-getting-a-national-vaccine-passport-so-lets-use-the-next-best-thing-cdc-vaccination-cards [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-25 09:04:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-25 13:04:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.kff.org/?post_type=perspective&p=523456 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => perspective [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 520692 [post_author] => 36621681 [post_date] => 2021-04-29 05:00:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-04-29 09:00:09 [post_content] => A shorter version of this column has been published by Axios. In an apparent break with the past, a surprising share of corporate leaders are now willing to support government efforts to tame health spending. Historically Republican-leaning and weary of government, only a tiny share oppose regulation. The test of how serious they are will be whether they lend their support to legislation in Congress or state legislatures to tame health and drug costs. That’s one takeaway from a new survey of over 300 large private employers with 5,000 employees or more we conducted at KFF with the Purchaser Business Group on Health, supported by the West Health Institute. Notably, we surveyed corporate leaders, not benefits officers, including forty CEO’s. + What’s motivating the change: 87% of the corporate officers we surveyed in big companies said they believed the cost of health benefits will become unsustainable over the next 5-10 years, and 85% said there was a need for a greater government role on costs and providing coverage. + 78% expressed some level of support for government action on hospital prices where there is limited competition. And perhaps more significantly coming from what has always been an anti-regulatory crowd, less than five percent opposed it. Similar numbers supported and opposed government limits on drug prices. + 65% expressed some level of support for a public option for their own workers while again, similarly small numbers opposed the idea. There was similar support for lowering the age of Medicare eligibility as well. Corporate leaders surveyed say they will continue to pursue value-based payment, raise cost sharing, and do all the things they have been doing to try to control their health costs. But they don’t have the market clout to do much about health costs on their own. The returns from the payment and delivery reforms which have recently been in vogue have been modest for them. They saw the highly touted Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, JP Morgan Chase health cost initiative collapse. The back story: corporate America appears to be more progressive than it was in the days when it was led by manufacturing and banking giants, with leaders like Walter Wriston at Citibank and Lee Iacocca at Chrysler speaking out about health costs but almost never supporting regulation. It is now led by tech and consumer industries who, pushed by shareholders and sometimes more progressive CEO’s, are taking on causes like voting rights. More of its leaders are comfortable with government action to solve problems. As the nation comes out of the pandemic health spending is also starting to rise again. Employers may soon forget the heroic actions of local hospitals when high prices hit their bottom lines. Some are also learning that many of their local hospitals did just fine during the pandemic, aided by government relief checks. Yes but: corporate America has talked a big game about health costs for decades and consistently failed to support legislation that would address it. Corporate leaders are on hospital boards, know the top doctors where they live and can sometimes be persuaded that policies aimed at reducing costs will compromise the medical institutions they care about. Congress does listen to CEO’s. If they add their weight to legislative debates about health costs and drug prices, it could make a real difference and they seem more inclined to do it. [post_title] => Corporate Leaders Are Getting Bullish On Government Action On Health Care Costs [post_excerpt] => In this Axios column, Drew Altman explores whether the long struggle with rising health costs has caused the tide to turn in corporate leaders’ attitudes towards government involvement in controlling health spending and whether it is part of a larger shift in comfort with government action to solve problems. 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A shorter version of this column has been published by Axios. “Your doctor and your nurse trusts the COVID-19 vaccine; you can too.” It’s one of the most important messages vaccine reluctant Americans can hear. They trust their doctors and their nurses and almost all of them have been vaccinated or plan to get vaccinated. By the numbers:
  • Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, majorities of U.S. adults have said their doctors and nurses were their most trusted sources of information about the coronavirus and eight in ten have said their doctors are the ones they will turn to when deciding whether or not to get a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Nearly nine in ten physicians (and nurses with graduate degrees) report either already being vaccinated or plan to get a vaccine.
  • A majority of all the other health care professionals who diagnose and treat patients say they are already vaccinated or plan to be (those with bachelor’s degree: 86%; associates degrees: 68%).
Frontline health care workers who provide other forms of care, such as assisting patients with bathing, housekeeping, or clerical work, have lower levels of vaccine uptake and report the same concerns of the public generally including concerns over the possible side effects or wanting to wait and see how it works for other people. Similar to the public overall, the share of these workers who are waiting to see how the vaccine works for others will likely shrink as more of their colleagues get vaccinated. Because they are such trusted messengers doctors and nurses are in a special position to put their voices where their arms have already been. They can get the word out to their communities that they have been vaccinated and encourage community members to get vaccinated too. This is why together with the Black Coalition Against COVID we created The Conversation, a campaign by Black doctors and nurses for Black people, soon to be followed by a similar campaign for the Latino community.
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Explaining KFF

Drew E. Altman, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer. Updated: April 2021 Follow Dr. Altman on Twitter: @DrewAltman
This essay discusses the choices we have made about our mission and operating style. Of course, I believe deeply in what we are doing at KFF, but I offer this with the caveat that our choices are not necessarily the right ones for others. Every organization has a different set of opportunities by virtue of its history, financing, its size, geographic location, its board CEO and staff, and other factors. I have always believed that our society is best served by having a wide range of us doing different things; a truly independent sector. Organizations also evolve and change (and should). And those of us in health care should be very humble about what we can achieve in a three plus trillion dollar health system dominated by money and politics. That should not stop us from asking how we can have the biggest impact, and from making sometimes tough strategic choices in crafting our mission and program strategies.
KFF is an endowed, nonprofit organization filling the need for trusted, independent information on national health issues. Legally we are a public charity — not a foundation — and as I hope you know, we are an independent national organization, headquartered in San Francisco, without any connection to Kaiser Permanente. We are an information organization, and we accomplish our mission through policy analysis, polling, journalism, and social impact media campaigns — the core components of KFF which enable us to play our national role. We do two things well, policy and media; there’s a lot in health care we are not the experts on and we leave to others who are. We don’t think better information is the answer to everything that ails our country or our health system; we do believe it can be a counterweight to the money and politics and misinformation that often dominates health policy. It’s the role we have chosen to play and the niche we have chosen to fill. The hallmark of KFF is our focus on how policy affects people. Our work deals with the intricacies of financing and with policy and public programs. We are experts on Medicaid, Medicare, the ACA, problems like the uninsured or employer health coverage, and many more similar issues. The work is often quite technical. But almost everything we do, no matter how arcane, is at its core also about inequality and economic security, racism and racial equity, and the future of our diverse society. These larger issues that animate and sometimes divide our society lie behind the technical work we do and motivate us. COVID-19, with its disproportionate impact on communities of color and profound economic consequences, is the perfect example of a health issue that surfaces every one of these larger challenges. I am proud of how our organization has pivoted on a dime to devote all of our capabilities to the pandemic. We believe in the importance of evidence and facts – these are core values for us – but we also approach our job with respect for diverse views about health and social policy and more than a little humility about the role we or any one organization can play in our giant health care system. We cannot change what’s broken in the American political system by ourselves, but we can and do try to be a constructive force in it. We are a voice for people, we want to hold both government and the health system accountable for its failures, but we never try to achieve any particular outcome, or take positions or advocate for policies or programs. We want to ensure that debate is informed by credible and timely information — whether it’s an analysis, a poll, or a Kaiser Health News (KHN) story or investigation or a COVID-19 information campaign on vaccines. I had an opportunity to come to California, and build the current day organization with this mission in my head, when the board of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation made a decision around 1990 to start over after what were then contentious times at the organization. We established the new mission, recruited staff, developed programs, became an operating foundation, and then later, a public charity, choosing the legal status that fit us best and most honestly represented what we are. Nowadays we simply refer to ourselves as KFF. Special gratitude is owed to the first board who empowered me to conduct such a crazy experiment, especially the late Hale Champion my first board chair and early co-conspirator, Congresswoman Barbara Jordan, and Secretary Joseph Califano. We have a Board of Trustees of up to 14 — including myself — with backgrounds in public service, academia, nonprofits, health care, and media. They serve two, five-year terms. Ours is a true governing board that exercises ultimate authority over everything at KFF and is very engaged in the organization, but it is not a board involved in program or operations, funding KFF, or fundraising, as is the case in some nonprofits. Our current Chair is the former governor of Wisconsin, Jim Doyle. As a student of these things I can say that no nonprofit organization enjoys a healthier partnership between its staff and board, and no board operates more effectively or more democratically. The relationship between the CEO and board at KFF, and the commitment everyone involved with KFF has to our mission, has been an essential ingredient to our success over many years and one of the things that has made this job so enjoyable. We made a fundamental decision to remain a California-based organization. However, with our core audiences largely in D.C., we have maintained a substantial presence there, constructing a building in 2000 with our Barbara Jordan Conference Center and basing a large staff contingent there as well. We moved our headquarters from the Silicon Valley — where we had long owned a nine-building office complex full of venture capitalists — to San Francisco in 2018, feeling the city would offer a stronger future for our organization. We are thrilled with our new location. We have not changed our legal name — the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation — even though it can cause occasional confusion because we are neither a foundation, a family foundation, nor are we associated with Kaiser Permanente. We keep the name to honor the legacy of our original benefactor, the great industrialist Henry J. Kaiser, whose motto “find a need and fill it,” we have adapted into our motto: “Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues.” HJK did many things differently, as have we, and we feel a real affinity with him and honor his legacy. Our expert staff is our principal organizational asset. They conduct the analyses you see us produce, our KFF polls and surveys, and produce the great journalism distributed by KHN and run our media campaigns on HIV and COVID-19. Each part of KFF makes a slightly different contribution to our overall role as an information organization. We try to balance policy debate with facts and new information through our policy analysis, working in real time, or as close to it as we can. We try to give people a voice with our gold-standard polling, maintaining the highest methodological standards in a changing industry. We try to decode and dissect health policy and hold government and the health system accountable for that same public through in-depth reporting from KHN. There are some other dimensions of our work we are very proud of, all of which are also about producing information. For over 20 years we have operated Emmy and Peabody Award-winning, very targeted information campaigns aimed at the groups most at risk of HIV. You can check out the Greater Than AIDS website to learn more. Now we have added a new campaign called Greater Than COVID, featuring THE CONVERSATION, Between Us, About Us, a joint effort with the Black Coalition Against COVID and a vehicle for Black doctors and nurses to reach out to the Black community about the COVID-19 vaccines. A Latino campaign will follow. And we have a substantial Global Health Policy Program that mirrors the work we do in domestic health policy. Our newest and fastest-growing program is Kaiser Health News, which I started in 2009. The idea was to establish a nonprofit national news service inside KFF dedicated to in-depth reporting on complex health policy issues, unencumbered by the incentives that sometimes affect commercial news organizations or destination websites. KHN would produce original, in-depth coverage of complex national health issues and bring it to the American people. To do that we built KHN on a distribution — not destination — website model. KHN is a core line item in our operating budget. It is also editorially independent with regard to story ideas and content, but otherwise operates like all of our other programs with its mission, budget, and personnel decisions controlled centrally by me and ultimately our Board. KHN is now the largest health policy newsroom in the country, producing a wide range of journalism for print, radio, and TV, from explanatory stories to features and deep investigations. We now operate several regional bureaus and look to stand up a southern bureau next to lead our reporting across the South. Several  years ago we lowered the rate at which we spend from our endowment to about 5.5% annually in order to maintain the real value of our spending power and assets over time. We spent at a much higher rate while we were building a new organization and now want to sustain what we have built. Our operating budget is just north of $44 million a year, which is not big, but adequate for us to do what we need to do with our operating organization style. When we lowered our payout rate to a more typical level we changed our financing model (a big change for the organization). Overall, we now support ourselves about 70% from our endowment and 30% from external funds, which mostly come from foundations, and state and local health departments with whom we partner on Greater Than AIDS. We use external funds chiefly for the incremental costs of mission- critical projects we could not otherwise undertake. We greatly value our funders, without whom we could not do vital work, but maintain full, independent control of everything we do in our funding relationships. That’s us in a nutshell. An information organization trying to play a special role on the national health care scene, with no delusions about how hard that is to do. We keep changing and evolving as an organization and would rather make mistakes then stand pat. Since we operate our own programs, if something isn’t working as planned, we can adapt and fix it. We change and adapt constantly to try to be more effective – changing our financing model to bring in external funds, changing our legal status twice, building a DC building, moving to San Francisco, starting our news service KHN and much more. We love the work, and along the way we have created a family of colleagues who truly enjoy working together and are devoted to our unique mission. We have handled virtual work as well as possible, thanks largely to our staff who are always ready to reach out and support one another. We are looking forward eagerly to the day when we can get back together in our offices again. [post_title] => President's Message [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => presidents-message [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-04-12 13:09:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-04-12 17:09:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://staging.kff.alley.ws/?page_id=54937 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => page [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 517849 [post_author] => 36621681 [post_date] => 2021-03-31 15:03:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-03-31 19:03:58 [post_content] => In an op-ed for The Washington Post, KFF President Drew Altman spells out how COVID-19 vaccination can be simplified to ensure that the public’s rising confidence in the vaccine isn’t thwarted by frustrating and sometimes dysfunctional websites.  He writes, “Americans who are on the fence about getting vaccinated might be more willing if they heard the process for making appointments was easier to navigate. As the country works to simplify eligibility, it can also improve the process for actually getting shots into arms." [post_title] => Dysfunctional websites are making it harder for Americans to get vaccinated. Here’s how to fix that. [post_excerpt] => In an op-ed for The Washington Post, Drew Altman spells out how COVID-19 vaccination can be simplified to ensure that the public’s rising confidence in the vaccine isn’t thwarted by frustrating and sometimes dysfunctional websites. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dysfunctional-websites-are-making-it-harder-for-americans-to-get-vaccinated-heres-how-to-fix-that [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-03-31 15:39:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-03-31 19:39:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.kff.org/?post_type=perspective&p=517849 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => perspective [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 523549 [post_author] => 36621681 [post_date] => 2021-05-26 05:00:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-05-26 09:00:39 [post_content] => A shorter version of this column has been published by Axios. Big myths about COVID vaccines are showing real staying power among Americans who are not vaccinated. They are not the only factor fueling vaccine hesitancy, but they are a continuing problem the media, health leaders and trusted messengers ought to be able to chip away at to get more people vaccinated. With social media rife with misinformation, large shares of unvaccinated Americans have latched on to misbeliefs about the vaccines. One big myth with legs is that the vaccines themselves cause COVID. 36% of unvaccinated adults either believe this or are not sure, and 41% of unvaccinated Blacks do. Another myth is that the vaccines cause infertility. 29% of unvaccinated adults believe that or don’t know, as do 31% of Republicans. 34% of Republicans also say the vaccines contain fetal cells or are not sure if they do. About the same shares of unvaccinated adults believe the vaccines change your DNA and that you should not get vaccinated if you have had COVID. All told 67% of unvaccinated adults cling to one of the major myths about vaccines we asked about in our KFF Vaccine Monitor. A significant misconception among unvaccinated Latinos is that getting vaccinated will cost them money, with 52% believing it will. Practical obstacles to vaccination such as this or worries that they will not be able to get time off from work to get their shots or deal with side effects weigh heavily on unvaccinated Latinos, many of whom want to get vaccinated. Unvaccinated adults don’t all get their information from social media. Their top sources of information on vaccines are cable tv, network and local tv news, and friends and family. But their misconceptions could still mostly be coming from social media, which is a top information source on vaccines for 18-29 year olds. Leaders from President Biden on down can keep hammering away at the facts. So can the media. That should help dispel myths even as trust in government and media has declined. The persistence of vaccine myths also underscore the need to do a better job policing misinformation about vaccines on social media that affect life and death decisions. One big opportunity jumps out. Doctors, nurses, community health workers and pharmacists are both important sources of information for unvaccinated Americans and trusted messengers. They have a special role to play in their communities clearing up the myths about vaccines that remain among the most hesitant groups. [post_title] => Persistent Vaccine Myths [post_excerpt] => With news that the country has now vaccinated half of its population with at least one dose, This Drew Altman Axios column highlights the persistent COVID-19 vaccine myths that are believed by a substantial portion of the unvaccinated population and discusses the options to address vaccine misinformation. 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The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Headquarters: 185 Berry St., Suite 2000, San Francisco, CA 94107 | Phone 650-854-9400
Washington Offices and Barbara Jordan Conference Center: 1330 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005 | Phone 202-347-5270

www.kff.org | Email Alerts: kff.org/email | facebook.com/KaiserFamilyFoundation | twitter.com/kff

Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco, California.