Short-Term and Other Policies Sold Outside of the Marketplace

I’m pretty healthy now. Does it make sense to buy a cheaper, short-term policy now, and then go back to a Marketplace policy if I do get sick?

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That strategy involves some risks.  First, if you do get sick while covered under a short-term policy, it might not cover benefits for the care you need.  For example, many short-term policies don’t cover, or only provide limited coverage for prescription drugs.

Second, if you do get sick while covered under a short-term policy, the insurer can look back to see if your condition could be considered “pre-existing.”  For example, if you are diagnosed with cancer, the insurer might decide the cancer was growing in you before you bought the policy, even though you didn’t know it, and so exclude coverage for the pre-existing condition.

Third, if you become seriously ill or injured while covered under a short-term policy, the insurer will most likely refuse to sell you new coverage once your policy term ends.  At that point, you might be able to buy a comprehensive policy through the Marketplace that won’t turn you down, but these are only offered during annual Open Enrollment periods and new coverage won’t start until January 1.  That means you could be  uninsured for many weeks or months before new Marketplace coverage begins.  Loss of coverage under a short-term policy will not make you eligible for a special enrollment period to buy Marketplace coverage mid-year.

While we have made every effort to provide accurate information in these FAQs, people should contact the health insurance Marketplace or Medicaid agency in their state for guidance on their specific circumstances.