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Loneliness and Social Isolation in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan: An International Survey

To understand more about how people view the issue of loneliness and social isolation, the Kaiser Family Foundation, in partnership with The Economist, conducted a cross-country survey of adults in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan. The survey included additional interviews with individuals who report always or often feeling lonely, left out, isolated or that they lack companionship to better understand the personal characteristics and life circumstances associated with these feelings, the reported causes of loneliness, and how people are coping. More than a fifth of adults in the United States and the United Kingdom as well as one in ten adults in Japan say they often or always feel lonely, feel that they lack companionship, feel left out, or feel isolated from others, and many of them say their loneliness has had a negative impact on various aspects of their life. About six in ten say there is a specific cause of their loneliness, and they are also more likely to report experiencing negative life events in the past two years, such as a negative change in financial status. Those reporting loneliness in each country report having fewer confidants than others and two-thirds or more say they have just a few or no relatives or friends living nearby who they can rely on for support. Many in the U.S. and U.K. view the increased use of technology as a major reason why people are lonely or socially isolated, whereas fewer people in Japan say the same. But, for those experiencing loneliness or social isolation personally, they are divided as to whether they think social media makes their feelings of loneliness better or worse.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS

A comprehensive new national survey of young adults, ages 18-30, from the Kaiser Family Foundation finds more than three and half decades into the epidemic, HIV remains an issue of deep concern for young people of color, both for themselves as well as for those they know. Few of those surveyed know about advances in prevention and treatment that experts say could end HIV if more widely adopted.

For Young People of Color HIV Remains a Significant Concern for Self and Community

MENLO PARK, CA – A comprehensive new national survey of young adults, ages 18-30, from the Kaiser Family Foundation finds more than three and half decades into the epidemic, HIV remains an issue of deep concern for young people of color, both for themselves as well as for those they know.…

Survey Of Current And Recent College Students On Sexual Assault

This partnership poll from The Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation examines the issue of sexual assault on college campuses by exploring the views and experiences of students ages 17 to 26 currently or recently enrolled in a four-year college or university who live on or near campus. The survey provides new, nationally representative estimates of the share who say they were sexually assaulted during college.

Behind the Increase in HIV Infections Among Gay and Bisexual Men

In his latest column for The Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank, Drew Altman explores why the problem of HIV among gay and bisexual men is urgent–and under the radar. All previous columns by Drew Altman are available online.

HIV/AIDS In The Lives Of Gay And Bisexual Men In The United States

More than thirty years into the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and at a time when infections among gay and bisexual men are on the rise in the U.S., a new national survey of gay and bisexual men by the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that though HIV/AIDS is named as the number one health issue facing their population, a majority are not personally concerned about becoming infected, and relatively few report having been tested recently. Only about a quarter know about PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) and fewer than half are aware that the current guidelines for people with HIV are to start antiretroviral (ARV) treatment as soon as they are diagnosed.