Federal and state laws, as well as insurers’ coverage policies, shape the extent to which women can have coverage for abortion services under both publicly funded programs and private plans. Women who seek an abortion, but do not have coverage for the service, shoulder the out-of-pocket costs of the services.
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Further Findings from Kaiser’s June Health Tracking Poll: Women’s Issues

The latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll examines the public’s attitudes, with a focus on views of women ages 18-44, toward several key women’s issues including workplace protections and reproductive health – as well as the role that these issues may play in the 2018 midterm elections.

Abortion Coverage in the Premium Relief Act of 2017 (HR 4666)

This issue brief reviews current federal and state policies on private insurance coverage of abortion services, and how the Premium Relief Act of 2017 would affect abortion coverage for women enrolled in the individual market and some small group plans.

Abortion Coverage, Private Insurance Plans, and the American Health Care Act

The American Health Care Act passed by House Republicans in May would go further than existing law to restrict the availability of abortion coverage through private insurance policies. It would ban abortion coverage in all marketplace plans as well as prohibit the use of federal tax credits to purchase any…

What Is the Scope of the Mexico City Policy: Assessing Abortion Laws in Countries That Receive U.S. Global Health Assistance

This data note assesses how the Mexico City Policy affects the provision of legal abortion services in U.S. assisted countries. The policy requires foreign NGOs to certify that they will not “perform or actively promote abortion as a method of family planning” using funds from any source (including non-U.S. funds) as a condition for receiving most U.S. government global health assistance.