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A Look at People Who Have Persistently High Spending on Health Care

This analysis looks at the amounts and types of health spending for people with employer-based health insurance who have continuing high health care spending. It finds that, among people with three consecutive years of coverage from a large employer, just 1.3 percent of enrollees accounted for almost 20 percent of…

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The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Analysis: ‘Cadillac Tax’ on High-Cost Health Plans Could Affect 1 in 5 Employers in 2022

A new KFF analysis estimates that the Affordable Care Act’s tax on high-cost health plans would affect one in five (21%) employers offering health benefits when it takes effect in 2022 unless employers change their health plans. An even larger share (31%) could be affected when workers’ voluntary contributions to…

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How Many Employers Could Be Affected by the High-Cost Plan Tax

The high cost plan tax (HCPT) sometimes referred to as the Cadillac tax, is an excise tax on the cost of employer health benefit exceeding certain threshold. The HCPT provides a powerful incentive to control health plans costs over time, whether through efficiency gains or shifts in costs to workers. While many employers do not expect that the tax will take effect in 2022, others are already amending their health programs in anticipation. We estimate if the tax takes effect in 2022, 21% will be subject to the tax, increasing to 37% by 2030 unless firms reduce costs. Large shares would be affected when counting workers’ voluntary contributions to Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs)

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The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Explaining Texas v. U.S.: A Guide to the 5th Circuit Appeal in the Lawsuit Challenging the Affordable Care Act 

The outcome of the Texas v. U.S. legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) could have far-reaching consequences for the nation’s health system, from rolling back the expansion of Medicaid to removing protections for people with pre-existing conditions and revoking the ability of adult children to stay on their…

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Explaining Texas v. U.S.: A Guide to the 5th Circuit Appeal in the Case Challenging the ACA

This issue brief answers key questions about Texas v. U.S., the case challenging the Affordable Care Act, leading up to the oral argument on appeal.

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Individual Insurance Market Performance in Early 2019

New data from the first three months of 2019 suggest that insurers in the individual market remain profitable, even with average premiums falling for the first time since the ACA was implemented. These data indicate that the individual market appears to be stable so far in 2019, despite the repeal of the individual mandate penalty and the proliferation of loosely-regulated short-term insurance plans.

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The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

About 1 in 6 Emergency Visits and Hospital Stays Had At Least One Out-of-Network Charge in 2017

In roughly 1 of every 6 emergency room visits and inpatient hospital stays in 2017, patients came home with at least one out-of-network medical bill, a new KFF analysis finds. More specifically, 18 percent of all emergency visits and 16 percent of in-network hospital stays had at least one out-of-network…

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An Examination of Surprise Medical Bills and Proposals to Protect Consumers from Them

This analysis examines how often patients get hit with surprise medical bills, what circumstances tend to give rise to them and what proposals are being considered to protect consumers from this problem. The study of claims data from large employer health plans finds that in roughly 1 of every 6…

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The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Strategies for Improving Health Coverage and Reducing Costs: Major Proposals and Key Considerations

KFF’s Tricia Neuman’s testimony before the U.S. House Committee on Ways and Means on June 12, 2019 describes a range of proposals to broaden health insurance coverage and make health care more affordable, the similarities and differences among them, and the policy choices and trade-offs that could have significant implications for coverage and costs.

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