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To Switch or Not to Switch: Are Medicare Beneficiaries Switching Drug Plans To Save Money?

This analysis finds that relatively few Medicare beneficiaries have switched Part D prescription drug plans voluntarily during the annual open enrollment period — even though those who do switch often lower their out-of-pocket costs as a result of changing plans. The vast majority (87% on average between 2006 and 2010) stayed in the same Part D plan, even though the plans can change premiums, deductibles, cost-sharing amounts, and their list of covered drugs each year. Higher rates of plan switching were observed in PDPs that increased premiums, increased deductibles, or dropped coverage of brand-name drugs in the coverage gap.

Medicare Advantage 2013 Spotlight: Enrollment Market Update

This Data Spotlight provides an overview of Medicare Advantage enrollment patterns in March 2013, and examines variations by plan type, state, and firm. It also analyzes trends in premiums paid by beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare Advantage plans, including variations by plan type, and describes the out-of-pocket limits and prescription drug coverage in the Part D “donut hole” provided by the plans in 2013.

Medicaid Enrollment: June 2012 Data Snapshot

This issue brief updates our monthly Medicaid enrollment figures to include data as of June 2012. The issue brief discusses enrollment trends across all 50 states and DC as well as within select groups such as Families, the Aged & Disabled, as well as adult expansions (largely focusing on adults without dependent children or childless adults).

Health Care Costs in the U.S.: The Role of Prices and Volume

The Alliance for Health Reform and several cosponsors held the first event in a three-part series of discussions on costs, the factors driving them up and what (if anything) can be done about them. This briefing and others in the series take an in-depth look at a select few of…

Overview of Health Coverage for Individuals with Limited English Proficiency

This brief provides an overview of the population of people in the United States with limited English proficiency (LEP) and describes their access to health coverage and care. There were 21.1 million such individuals in 2010, accounting for nearly 9 percent of the nonelderly population. Most are Hispanic, Spanish-speaking adults.…