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Countdown To 2015 Initiative Releases Report Detailing Progress On Maternal, Newborn, Child Health

“Progress on maternal, newborn and child health, in the 75 highest-burden countries, most in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where more than 95 percent of all maternal and child deaths occur, has been laid out in a new 220-page report, ‘Building a Future for Women and Children,’ which is published by the Countdown to 2015 initiative,” a Countdown to 2015 press release reports. “Since 1990, annual maternal deaths have declined by almost one half and the deaths of young children have declined from 12 million to 7.6 million in 2010,” the press release states. It details a number of the key findings from the report and notes that the report’s release “coincides with a two-day [Child Survival Call to Action] forum to chart a course toward the end of preventable child deaths, taking place June 14-15 in Washington, D.C.” (6/13).

The Guardian Examines Results Of Countdown To 2015 Report, Provides Interactive Map

“More than 50 countries look set to miss both Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets for cutting mortality rates for young children and mothers by the 2015 deadline, according to” the Countdown to 2015 report, “Building a Future for Women and Children,” released by the WHO on Wednesday, the Guardian reports. “The Countdown report echoes many findings of the WHO’s World Health Statistics 2012 survey, published last month, which found that although improvements in the poorest areas have accelerated, ‘large variations in health … persist both between and within countries,'” the newspaper notes. The Guardian goes on to detail the key findings of the report and provides a link to an interactive map of key indicators for progress on health-related MDGs (6/14).

U.N. SG Ban Names 26 Members To High-Level Advisory Panel For Development Agenda

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday “announced the members of a High-level Panel to advise on the global development agenda beyond 2015, the target date for achieving the anti-poverty targets known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs),” the U.N. News Centre reports. “The eight MDGs, agreed on by world leaders at a U.N. summit in 2000, set specific targets on poverty alleviation, education, gender equality, child and maternal health, environmental stability, HIV/AIDS reduction, and a ‘Global Partnership for Development,'” the news service writes (7/31).

Process For Setting New Global Development Goals Should Be Open, Inclusive

In this CNN opinion piece, Jamie Drummond, co-founder and executive director of ONE, notes the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is approaching, assesses progress towards these goals and examines issues surrounding the creation of a new set of goals. “With partners we’ve worked on a few specific commitments in the fight against extreme poverty, hunger, and disease and seen how when they are focused, such agreements can make a real measurable difference,” he writes, and briefly discusses progress made against AIDS and malaria over the last decade. “When you’ve seen campaigns such as these go from the margins to the mainstream and achieve real success and save lives, it is hard not to be supportive of more such goals,” but “the key thing here is, what do you think should be in the new goals?” he continues. “The process by which they could be agreed in the middle of the second decade of the 21st century should certainly look very different than that through which they were agreed at the end of the 1990s” because of advancements in technology, he writes, noting, “We can today poll, scientifically, people across the developing world in ways we couldn’t before. We can also ask a wider community of people around the world what they want the goals to be and how they want to support the achievement of these goals.” He concludes, “My belief is that not only will the new goals build on the momentum of the original goals and in many cases finish off the job they started, but we will also develop a bigger constituency for getting the goals finished than we had the first time around” (8/26).

Health Must Be Recognized In Future Framework For Fighting Global Poverty

Noting “[w]e are just three years away from the target date for achieving the U.N. Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) agreed by all … U.N. member states back in 2000 to eradicate global poverty,” Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, in this Independent opinion piece reflects “on the critical role of health in and beyond the Millennium Development Goals” ahead of the second meeting of the U.N. Secretary General’s High-Level Panel on the future strategy to fight global poverty, set to take place in London on Wednesday. Piot writes that the MDGs have “given local and global focus to efforts to tackle the big issues,” while inspiring action, innovation, and new financing models, but he notes “there is still so much more we need to do.”

New Development Goals Should Acknowledge Health, Education, Aid, But Focus On Economic Reform

Noting the 67th session of the U.N. General Assembly begins on September 25, Charles Kenny, senior fellow at the Center for Global Development and a Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation, writes in his Bloomberg Businessweek blog, “Small World,” “Accompanying the usual podium speeches will be the start of backroom discussions as to what will replace the Millennium Development Goals [MDGs], a set of targets for global progress agreed to at the 2000 General Assembly meetings.” He continues, “The original Millennium Goals committed the world to halve poverty between 1990 and 2015, alongside ambitious targets to reduce childhood deaths, ensure that every child worldwide completes primary school, safeguard equal access to education for girls, improve access to sanitation, and reduce deaths from maternal mortality, AIDS, and malaria,” and he adds, “The planet has actually done pretty well in meeting these initial targets.”

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