State and Federal Contraceptive Coverage Requirements: Implications for Women and Employers

Issue Brief
  1. U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. December 14, 2000. Decision- Contraception.

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  2. DC’s law becomes effective April 17, 2018.

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  3. Kaiser Family Foundation and Health Research Educational Trust, 2017 Employer Health Benefits Survey.

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  4. After the Supreme Court ruling in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, the Obama administration issued new regulations, extending the accommodation to closely held for profit corporation. The regulations define closely held corporation as an entity that 1) is not a nonprofit, 2) has no publicly traded ownership interests, and 3) has more than 50 percent of the value of its ownership interest owned directly or indirectly by five or fewer individuals. 45 CFR §147.131 (b)(4)

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  5. The Little Sisters of the Poor (LSOP), a religiously-affiliated nursing home that challenged the accommodation under the Obama Administration regulations, requested party status as an intervenor in both the PA and CA cases. The California Northern District Court granted the LSOP party status, the Pennsylvania Eastern District Court denied the LSOP request for party status. The LSOP have appealed the Pennsylvania Eastern District Court decision to deny them party status. The California Northern District Court also granted March for Life Education and Defense Fund, a nonprofit with moral objections to some contraceptive methods, party status. As parties in the case, the LSOP and March for Life Education and Defense Fund have appealed the California Northern District Court decision issuing the preliminary injunction.

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  6. Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of state laws, and Insurance Coverage of Contraceptives, State Policies in Brief, as of March 1, 2018, Guttmacher Institute.

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  7. DC’s law becomes effective April 17, 2018.

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  8. Massachusetts’s law becomes effective May 2018.

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  9. Maine’s law becomes effective January 2019.

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  10. Oregon’s law becomes effective January 2019.

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  11. Washington’s law becomes effective January 2019.

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Appendix
  1. Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 20-826Y, Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 20-1057.08A(1)–(2), Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 20-1402L(1)–(2), Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §20-1404U(1)–(2), Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann.§ 20-2329A(1)–(2).

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  2. Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 38A-503e, Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 38A-530e

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  3. NH Rev. Stat. sec. 420-B:8-gg, NH Rev. Stat. sec. 415:18-I, NH Rev. Stat. sec. 420A:17-c

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  4. NJ Stat. Ann. § 17:48-6ee, NJ Stat. Ann. § 17:48a-7bb, NJ Stat. Ann. § 17:48E-35.29, NJ Stat. Ann. § 17:48F-13.2, NJ Stat. Ann § 17B:26-2.1y, NJ Stat. Ann. § 17B:27-46.1ee, NJ Stat. Ann. § 17B:27A-7.12, NJ Stat. Ann. § 17B:27A-19.15, NJ Stat. Ann. § 26:2J-4.30, NJ Stat. Ann. § 52:14-17.29j

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  5. NM Stat § 59A-22-42, NM Stat. Ann. § 59A-46-44

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  6. RI Gen. Laws § 27-19-48(b)–(d), RI Gen. Laws § 27-18-57(b)–(e), RI Gen. Laws § 27-20-43(b)–(d), RI Gen. Laws § 27-41-59(b)–(d)

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