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Medicaid Work Requirements: Implications for Low Income Women’s Coverage

This data note documents differences by sex in the work status of non-elderly (19-64) adult Medicaid enrollees who were not receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and were not dually eligible for Medicare in 2019, and highlights differences between different subgroups of women and by parenting status.

Medicaid Work Requirements at the U.S. Supreme Court

Though the Trump Administration has left office, the Supreme Court is set to decide whether Medicaid work requirements – a controversial policy advanced by the Trump Administration – are legal.

The Landscape of Medicaid Demonstration Waivers Ahead of the 2020 Election

As the Trump administration reaches the end of its first term, this issue brief considers the landscape of approved and pending Section 1115 Medicaid demonstration waivers under this administration and how the November 2020 presidential election may impact this landscape.

A Reconfigured U.S. Supreme Court: Implications for Health Policy

U.S. Supreme Court decisions shape health policy in important ways. The nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, if confirmed, is expected to establish a solid 6:3 conservative majority that could affect case outcomes in several areas. This issue brief considers the potential implications of a reconfigured Court for health policy issues, including those already on the Court’s docket for the coming term and those that the Court may choose to consider in this term or in the future.

3 Key Questions About the Arkansas Medicaid Work and Reporting Requirements Case

This issue brief answers three key questions about the implications of the appeals court’s decision setting aside the Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary’s approval of a Section 1115 Medicaid waiver amendment that included work and reporting requirements and restriction of retroactive coverage in Arkansas.

Medicaid Work Requirements and People with HIV

This data note examines the potential implications of work requirements for people with HIV, a population that relies heavily on Medicaid and for whom there are important clinical and public health reasons for maintaining consistent access to insurance coverage and HIV care.

Supporting Work without the Requirement: State and Managed Care Initiatives

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) continues to promote state adoption of work and reporting requirements as a condition of Medicaid eligibility for certain nonelderly adults, although several such waivers have been set aside by federal courts. While most Medicaid adults are already working, some states and health plans have developed voluntary work support programs for nonelderly adults who qualify for Medicaid through non-disability pathways. These programs offer services that support work without conditioning Medicaid eligibility on having a job. This brief examines opportunities for and limitations on federal and state support of such programs, highlights several state and health plan initiatives, and explores their common themes.

Disability and Technical Issues Were Key Barriers to Meeting Arkansas’ Medicaid Work and Reporting Requirements in 2018

This issue brief analyzes the impact of the four measures intended to safeguard coverage for people with disabilities and others who should not have been subject to the work and reporting requirements. It draws on data newly available from Arkansas’ 2018 annual waiver report to CMS and monthly data released by the state while the requirements were in effect. The data reveal that few people used these safeguard measures relative to the number of people who lost coverage due to the new requirements. Among those who accessed the safeguards, the vast majority did so due to disability/other health issues or technical issues such as those related to reporting.

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Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco, California.