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Ask KFF: MaryBeth Musumeci Answers 3 Questions on Kentucky, Arkansas Medicaid Work and Reporting Requirement Cases

A federal district court has set aside the HHS Secretary’s approval of Medicaid waivers with work and reporting requirements and other eligibility and enrollment restrictions in Kentucky and Arkansas. For context as this all develops, we asked MaryBeth Musumeci, Associate Director at the Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, three questions about the implications of the decisions.

February State Data for Medicaid Work Requirements in Arkansas

Arkansas is one of seven states for which CMS has approved a Section 1115 waiver to condition Medicaid eligibility on meeting work and reporting requirements and the first state to implement this type of waiver. The new requirements were phased in for most enrollees ages 30-49 beginning in June 2018, and for individuals ages 19-29 starting in January 2019. Unless exempt, enrollees must engage in 80 hours of work or other qualifying activities each month and must report their work or exemption status by the 5th of the following month using an online portal; as of mid-December 2018, they also may report by phone. Monthly data related to the new requirements released by the Arkansas Department of Human Services show that over 18,000 people were disenrolled from Medicaid for failure to comply with the new requirements in 2018. Those who fail to comply with the requirements for any three months in 2019 can lose coverage beginning in April 2019. This brief looks at data for January 2019. Separate reports look at early implementation of the new requirements and enrollee experiences.

Medicaid Work Requirements in Arkansas: Experience and Perspectives of Enrollees

This brief presents perspectives of enrollees and safety net providers about Arkansas’ new Section 1115 Medicaid waiver work and reporting requirements based on focus groups and interviews. The discussions examine enrollees’ awareness of the new requirements and ability to set up online accounts for monthly reporting; the effect of the new requirements on enrollees’ work and common barriers to work; enrollees’ experience with monthly reporting; impacts on particular populations, such as those with disabilities or who are homeless; and the anticipated effects of coverage losses resulting from the new requirements.

The Implementation of Work Requirements in Arkansas Has Been Complex and Many Medicaid Enrollees Are Not Aware of New Rules or Face Obstacles in Complying

The implementation of Medicaid work requirements in Arkansas has been complex, with many Medicaid enrollees still not aware of program changes despite substantial outreach.  In addition, an online reporting requirement is proving difficult for many enrollees due to limited knowledge of the requirements as well as lack of computer literacy…

An Early Look at Implementation of Medicaid Work Requirements in Arkansas

This brief analyzes the early experience with implementation of work and reporting requirements in Arkansas, based on publicly available data and information, as well as targeted interviews with state officials, health plans, providers, and beneficiary advocates conducted in August and September 2018.

Does Employment Lead to Improved Health? New Research Review Finds Mixed Evidence with Caveats that Could Impact Applicability to Medicaid Work Requirements

With nearly a dozen states seeking or implementing waivers to add work requirements for some Medicaid beneficiaries, a central question is whether such policies promote health and therefore promote the goals of the Medicaid program. A new Kaiser Family Foundation report reviews research about the relationship between work and health…

The Relationship Between Work and Health: Findings from a Literature Review

A central question in the current debate over work requirements in Medicaid is whether such policies promote health and are therefore within the goals of the Medicaid program. This brief examines literature on the relationship between work and health and analyzes the implications of this research in the context of Medicaid work requirements.

What do different data sources tell us about Medicaid and work?

A central question in the ongoing debate about imposing work requirements in Medicaid is what current work patterns are among Medicaid adults and how many so-called “able bodied” adults are not already working. Answers to these questions rely on various data sources, and characteristics of the underlying data and analytic decisions may lead to different conclusions. This data note examines what different data sources and analytic decisions tell us about Medicaid and work.