President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress pursued several major efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) but were unable to get a bill through the U.S. Senate in 2017. In 2018, Congress did pass a tax bill that eliminated the ACA’s tax penalty for not obtaining health coverage beginning in 2019. The Trump Administration’s actions and decisions also have affected the ACA marketplaces and will continue to reshape how Americans get health insurance into 2019 and beyond.

For information about ACA Marketplace Open Enrollment, including fact sheets and 300+ FAQs, visit our collection of resources on Understanding Health Insurance.

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ACA Open Enrollment: If You Shop on Private Websites Instead of HealthCare.gov

Marketplace plans can now be sold through private websites, sometimes described as “direct enrollment” sites or “certified enrollment partner” sites. This short fact sheet explains how these sites and the plans they offer may differ from what consumers will find on HealthCare.gov.

FAQs: Health Insurance Marketplace and the ACA

This list of more than 300 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) covers the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance Marketplace (aka exchange), individual mandate, open enrollment, premiums and more. It provides answers to questions about specific groups, such as young adults, smokers, the uninsured, and non-traditional households.

Poll: Democrats Say They Are Hearing Enough From Presidential Candidates About Medicare-for-All and Expanding Coverage, But Want Them to Talk More about Health Costs and Women’s Health Care

Heading into tonight’s Democratic primary debate, most Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents say the candidates are spending the right amount or too much time talking about ways to provide coverage to more Americans and Medicare-for-all, two topics that have dominated health care discussions in the past three rounds of Democratic debates,…

Pre-Existing Condition Prevalence for Individuals and Families

This analysis estimates that almost 54 million people – or 27% of all adults under 65 —have pre-existing health conditions that would likely have made them uninsurable in the individual markets that existed in most states before the Affordable Care Act. Almost half (45%) of non-elderly families include at least one adult with such a pre-existing condition. The analysis also includes estimates by age, state and gender.

JAMA Forum: What is Trumpcare?

The debate among Democratic presidential candidates about how to reform the health care system largely boils down to whether to build on the Affordable Care Act and create an option for people to enroll in Medicare or create a Medicare for all plan that covers everyone. On the other side…