President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress pursued several major efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) but were unable to get a bill through the U.S. Senate in 2017. In 2018, Congress did pass a tax bill that eliminated the ACA’s tax penalty for not obtaining health coverage beginning in 2019.

In December 2019, a federal appeals court panel ruled that the law’s individual mandate is unconstitutional since Congress has set the mandate tax penalty to zero and sent the case back to a lower court to determine how much of the rest of the ACA should be invalidated. The case was first brought by a number of Republican state attorneys general, and the Trump administration now argues that nearly all of the ACA should be overturned. The U.S. Supreme Court has now agreed to review the case.

For information about ACA Marketplace Open Enrollment, including fact sheets and 300+ FAQs, visit our collection of resources on Understanding Health Insurance.

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How Many of the Uninsured Can Purchase a Marketplace Plan for Free?

This analysis looks at how many of the remaining uninsured are eligible for premium subsidies that are large enough to cover the entire cost of a bronze plan, which is the minimum level of coverage available on the Marketplaces. It estimates 27% of uninsured individuals who could shop on the ACA Marketplace, or 4.2 million people nationwide, are eligible to purchase a bronze plan with $0 premiums after subsidies in 2019.

The ACA Ruling Shows How the Times Have Changed on Health Care

In this Axios column about the Texas court decision, Drew Altman shows that many provisions of the Affordable Care Act are even more popular than protections for pre-existing conditions, the issue which put Republicans on the defensive and helped Democrats in the midterm elections.

Universal Coverage May Not Mean Everyone Has Health Insurance

Universal coverage is a big and important goal. But would absolutely everyone be covered under current proposals? Is it a better rallying cry for Democrats in the primaries or the general election? Drew Altman analyzes these questions in an Axios column.

JAMA Forum: Medicare-For-All or Medicare-For-More?

In this May 2019 post for The JAMA forum, Larry Levitt examines how the early discussion and positioning among the presidential candidates offers a glimpse into how a debate about Medicare-for-all might play out.

Medicaid Restructuring Under the American Health Care Act and Implications for Behavioral Health Care in the US

This brief outlines Medicaid’s role for people with behavioral health conditions and the implications of the American Health Care Act for these enrollees. It includes information on the potential impact of ending the enhanced federal financing for newly eligible adults, removing essential health benefits from state plan amendments, and converting federal Medicaid funding into a per capita cap.

Individual Insurance Market Performance in 2018

Individual market insurers are expecting to return to consumers a record total of about $800 million in medical loss ratio rebates for 2018, a year in which the insurance companies posted their best annual financial performance under the Affordable Care Act to date. Financial results for 2018 suggest that insurers in the individual market are generally returning to or exceeding profitability levels seen before 2014, when ACA insurance market rules took effect, including the requirement to cover people with pre-existing conditions.

JAMA Forum: What is Trumpcare?

The debate among Democratic presidential candidates about how to reform the health care system largely boils down to whether to build on the Affordable Care Act and create an option for people to enroll in Medicare or create a Medicare for all plan that covers everyone. On the other side…

An Update on Insurance Coverage Among People with HIV in the United States

This analysis provides national estimates of insurance coverage among people with HIV and finds about 1 in 10 are uninsured, similar to the share among the general population following the ACA’s coverage expansions. Medicaid is the single largest source of coverage for people with HIV due to the ACA’s Medicaid expansion. The analysis also looks at access to Ryan White program services, and the impact of coverage and the Ryan White program on people with HIV’s ability to achieve sustained viral suppression.