President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress pursued several major efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) but were unable to get a bill through the U.S. Senate in 2017. In 2018, Congress did pass a tax bill that eliminated the ACA’s tax penalty for not obtaining health coverage beginning in 2019.

In December 2019, a federal appeals court panel ruled that the law’s individual mandate is unconstitutional since Congress has set the mandate tax penalty to zero and sent the case back to a lower court to determine how much of the rest of the ACA should be invalidated. The case was first brought by a number of Republican state attorneys general, and the Trump administration now argues that nearly all of the ACA should be overturned. The U.S. Supreme Court has now agreed to review the case.

For information about ACA Marketplace Open Enrollment, including fact sheets and 300+ FAQs, visit our collection of resources on Understanding Health Insurance.

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2018 Elections: Key Medicaid Issues to Watch

Medicaid provides health insurance coverage for more than 76 million Americans, supplies funding for safety-net providers, and is the largest source of federal revenues for states. At this time last year, Congress was debating repeal and replace of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as well as more fundamental changes to Medicaid financing. While federal legislative changes to Medicaid did not pass in 2017, the outcomes of the 2018 elections will shape program changes at both the state and federal levels of government. Our state-specific fact sheets provide background information about Medicaid and the upcoming elections.

KFF Health Tracking Poll – November 2018: Priorities for New Congress and the Future of the ACA and Medicaid Expansion

Fielded a week after the 2018 midterm elections, this poll examines the public’s priorities for the next Congress, measures favorability for ACA provisions including Medicaid expansion, and takes a look at knowledge of the current open enrollment period among adults ages 18-64 who purchase their own insurance or are currently uninsured. With the impending Texas v. United States lawsuit, in addition to several Trump administration policy actions aimed at different aspects of the U.S. health care system, this KFF survey also examines the public’s position on pre-existing conditions protections, prescription drug advertisements, and employer exemptions from covering birth control.

How Many of the Uninsured Can Purchase a Marketplace Plan for Free?

This analysis looks at how many of the remaining uninsured are eligible for premium subsidies that are large enough to cover the entire cost of a bronze plan, which is the minimum level of coverage available on the Marketplaces. It estimates 27% of uninsured individuals who could shop on the ACA Marketplace, or 4.2 million people nationwide, are eligible to purchase a bronze plan with $0 premiums after subsidies in 2019.

The Uninsured and the ACA: A Primer – Key Facts about Health Insurance and the Uninsured amidst Changes to the Affordable Care Act

The Uninsured and the ACA: A Primer provides information on how insurance has changed under the ACA and more recent policy changes, how many people remain uninsured, who they are, and why they lack health coverage. It also summarizes what we know about the impact that a lack of insurance can have on the health outcomes and personal finances and the difference health insurance can make in people’s lives.

The ACA Ruling Shows How the Times Have Changed on Health Care

In this Axios column about the Texas court decision, Drew Altman shows that many provisions of the Affordable Care Act are even more popular than protections for pre-existing conditions, the issue which put Republicans on the defensive and helped Democrats in the midterm elections.