President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress pursued several major efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) but were unable to get a bill through the U.S. Senate in 2017. In 2018, Congress did pass a tax bill that eliminated the ACA’s tax penalty for not obtaining health coverage beginning in 2019.

In December 2019, a federal appeals court panel ruled that the law’s individual mandate is unconstitutional since Congress has set the mandate tax penalty to zero and sent the case back to a lower court to determine how much of the rest of the ACA should be invalidated. The case was first brought by a number of Republican state attorneys general, and the Trump administration now argues that nearly all of the ACA should be overturned. The U.S. Supreme Court has now agreed to review the case.

For information about ACA Marketplace Open Enrollment, including fact sheets and 300+ FAQs, visit our collection of resources on Understanding Health Insurance.

  • Your Selections:

Refine Results

date

Topics

Content Type

Tags

Poll: On Health Care, Democrats and Democratic-Leaning Independents Trust Sen. Sanders the Most, but Significantly More People Support a Public Option than Medicare-for-All

3 in 4 Americans Do Not Expect Congress to Take Action to Lower Drug Costs Before the 2020 Election Ahead of tonight’s Democratic presidential debate, Sen. Bernie Sanders is the candidate most trusted on health care by Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents, though the Medicare-for-all plan he has championed is significantly…

From Ballot Initiative to Waivers: What is the Status of Medicaid Expansion in Utah?

The Utah legislature significantly changed and limited the Medicaid coverage expansion that was adopted by the voters through a ballot initiative in November 2018. This issue brief explains new provisions in Utah’s recently amended Section 1115 Medicaid waiver and the additional amendments that the state has submitted to CMS, including most recently a request for enhanced ACA federal matching funds for an expansion to 138% FPL with an enrollment cap.

Data Note: Limited Navigator Funding for Federal Marketplace States

This brief reviews the data from CMS about its 2019 funding awards to Navigator programs serving consumers in the federal marketplace states during the 2020 open enrollment season, as well as funding trends over time. It breaks out the funding by state and identifies counties with no federally funded Navigators available to help consumers.

Affordable Care Act Premiums Are Falling in Many Areas of the U.S. in 2020, But Changes Vary Widely By County and Type of Plan, County-Level Analysis Shows 

Although premiums for Affordable Care Act Marketplace benchmark silver plans are decreasing on average across the U.S. in 2020, changes vary widely by geographic location and plan type, including premium increases in a number of counties and plans, according to a new KFF analysis of county-level data. The analysis of…

How ACA Marketplace Premiums Are Changing by County in 2020

Premiums for ACA Marketplace benchmark silver plans are decreasing on average across the U.S. in 2020. However, premium changes vary widely by location and by metal level, including premium increases in a number of counties and plans.

300+ FAQs Help Consumers Understand the ACA Marketplaces as Open Enrollment Begins

Ahead of the annual Affordable Care Act (ACA) open enrollment period, the time during which consumers can shop for health plans or renew existing coverage, KFF has updated and expanded its searchable collection of more than 300 Frequently Asked Questions about open enrollment, the health insurance marketplaces and the ACA.…

ACA Open Enrollment: If You Are Low-Income

This fact sheet explains 2020 health coverage options that may be available to people who have low incomes, including Medicaid coverage or individual insurance plans through Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplaces.

ACA Open Enrollment: If You Shop on Private Websites Instead of HealthCare.gov

Marketplace plans can now be sold through private websites, sometimes described as “direct enrollment” sites or “certified enrollment partner” sites. This short fact sheet explains how these sites and the plans they offer may differ from what consumers will find on HealthCare.gov.