Practice Of Banishing Menstruating Women Continues In Nepal Despite Being Outlawed

Foreign Policy: In Nepal, Tradition Is Killing Women
“…In Nepal’s predominantly agrarian communities, women are banished from their homes every month when they get their periods. Many are relegated to menstruation huts or sheds that families … have specifically built for their daughters or daughters-in-law; many other women are sent to adjoining barns, where they sleep among stinking cows, goats, and buffalo. This ancient Hindu practice is called chhaupadi, and it has been in place for hundreds of years in Nepal, as well as in parts of India and Bangladesh. … Nepal’s parliament criminalized chhaupadi in August 2017, in a law that was passed unanimously. … While women’s rights activists hailed the law as a step in the right direction, they were quick to point out that much more than a law would be needed to rid the country of the deep-rooted practice. … Sadly, they were right…” (Cousins, 1/6).

New York Times: Woman and 2 Children Die in Nepal Menstruation Hut
“When Amba Bohara’s period came this week, she followed a familiar routine in western Nepal. Considered impure in her village because she was menstruating, Ms. Bohara barricaded herself in a tiny hut, built a fire and braced for an icy winter night with her two young children. By Wednesday morning, all three were dead. … Ms. Bohara and her children were the latest victims of a centuries-old tradition of banishing menstruating women and girls from their family homes. Though Nepal criminalized the practice last year, many villages in the country continue to follow the taboo, known as chhaupadi in Nepali…” (Sharma/Schultz, 1/9).