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Medicaid and American Indians and Alaska Natives

Issue Brief
  1. Office of Minority Health, Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native Profile, http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=3&lvlid=62

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  2. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention, Suicide: Facts at a Glance (2015), (Atlanta, Georgia: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2015), https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/suicide-datasheet-a.pdf.

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  3. Edward Fox and Verné Borner, Health Care Coverage and Income of American Indians and Alaska Natives: A Comparative Analysis of 33 States with Indian Health Service Funded Programs, for Tribal Affairs: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, (2012), http://www.crihb.org/files/Health_care_coverage_and_income_of_aians.pdf; Ed Fox, Health Care Reform: Tracking Tribal, Federal, and State Implementation, Tribal Affairs Group, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, (May, 20, 2011) http://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Education/American-Indian-Alaska-Native/AIAN/Downloads/CMSHealthCareReform5202011.pdf; and Government Accountability Office, Indian Health Service, Health Care Services Are Not Always Available to Native Americans, GAO-05-789 (Washington DC: Government Accountability Office, August 2005), http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-05-789.

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  4. Ibid.

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  5. “Requirements – Priorities of Care,” Purchase/Referred Care (PCR), Indian Health Service, https://www.ihs.gov/prc/index.cfm?module=chs_requirements_priorities_of_care.

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  6. Section 1905(b) of the Social Security Act (third sentence).

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  7. This 100% federal matching rate is separate from the 100% federal matching provided to the “newly eligible” ACA expansion population and will remain in place when the 100% federal matching rate provided for all new eligibles begins to phase down.

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  8. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, op cit.

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  9. Indian Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services, Justification of Estimates for Appropriations Committees, (Washington, DC: HHS, FY 2015), https://www.ihs.gov/budgetformulation/includes/themes/newihstheme/documents/FY2015CongressionalJustification.pdf; Indian Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services, Justification of Estimates for Appropriations Committees, (Washington, DC: HHS, FY 2018), https://www.ihs.gov/budgetformulation/includes/themes/newihstheme/display_objects/documents/FY2018CongressionalJustification.pdf.

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  10. Jessica Bylander, “Propping Up Indian Health Care Through Medicaid,” Health Affairs 36, 8 (2017):1360-1364, http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/36/8/1360.full.pdf+html.

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  11. Ibid.

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  12. Deborah Bachrach, Patti Boozang, Anne Karl, and Kier Wallis, Repealing the Medicaid Expansion: Implications for Montana, (Los Angeles, CA: Manatt, March 2017), http://www.mthcf.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Repealing-the-Medicaid-Expansion-Implications-for-Montana_March-2017.pdf.

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