The U.S. Government and Global Health Security – Issue Brief – 9111-02
  1. Definition drawn from WHO’s World Health Report 2007 - A Safer Future: Global Public Health Security in the 21st Century, 2007 (http://www.who.int/whr/2007/overview/en/), and WHO’s Global Health Security web page (https://www.who.int/health-security/en/). Research and development activities for countermeasures to emerging diseases, while recognized as being important for global health security, are not included within the scope of this analysis. The terms “global health security” and “health security” do not have a universally agreed-upon definitions, and opinions can differ as to what is and is not included within each. See: C. McInnes, ‘The many meanings of health security’, in S. Rushton and J. Youde (eds), Routledge Handbook of Global Health Security, 2014, pp. 7-17; and W. Aldis, “Health security as a public health concept: a critical analysis,” Health Policy & Planning, 2008, 23(6):369–375.

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  2. Research and development activities for countermeasures to emerging diseases, while recognized as being important for global health security, are not included within the scope of this analysis.

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  3. The $385 million provided to USAID by Congress in FY 2015 included $312 million in emergency Ebola funding made available with no end date, and the $218 million provided in FY 2016 included $145.5 million in emergency Zika funding to be expended in that fiscal year.

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  4. Congress provided $100 million in reprogrammed FY 2015 emergency Ebola funding in FY 2018 and $38 million in reprogrammed FY 2015 emergency Ebola funding in FY 2019 for USAID global health security activities. See Table 1.

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