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Latin America and Caribbean

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USAID, Kimberly-Clark Announce Partnership To Improve Maternal, Child Health In Andean Region

USAID and Kimberly-Clark Corporation, a manufacturer of health and hygiene products, on Tuesday announced “they will work together to improve maternal and child health in the Andean region, starting in Colombia and Ecuador,” according to a USAID press release. Combining the U.S. government’s Global Health and Feed the Future initiatives…

Associated Press Highlights Challenges Of Global Population Growth

As the world’s population approaches seven billion, “experts say most of Africa — and other high-growth developing nations such as Afghanistan and Pakistan — will be hard-pressed to furnish enough food, water and jobs for their people, especially without major new family-planning initiatives,” the Associated Press/San Jose Mercury News reports. In the article, “Associated Press reporters on four continents examin[e] some of most distinctive examples” of how “population challenges vary dramatically around the world” (Crary et al., 10/15).

VOA News Examines How A Public-Private Partnership Will Combat Cancer Among Women In The Developing World

This VOA News editorial examines how a public-private partnership between PEPFAR, the George W. Bush Institute, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, as well as private sector partners will launch a program called Pink Ribbon, Red Ribbon to “combat cervical and breast cancer for women in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.” “In the developing world, women’s cancers are often neglected and associated with stigma that discourages women from seeing a doctor,” VOA writes. The editorial quotes Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton who said, “If we want to make progress on some of the toughest challenges we face in global health — fighting HIV, preventing childhood deaths, improving nutrition, stopping malaria, and more — then investing in women must be at the top of the agenda” (10/11).

The Nation Examines Rise In Unregulated Drug Trials In South America

The Nation examines how a surge in the outsourcing of clinical trials to contract research organizations (CROs) and a resulting increase in the number of trials being conducted in the developing world, where “regulations aren’t as onerous, patient recruitment is easier and informed consent is less clearly defined,” has led to a rise in unregulated drug trials in South America, noting that, according to a 2010 report by the inspector general of the HHS, “40 to 65 percent of clinical trials on FDA-regulated products in 2008 took place overseas. Of nearly 6,500 foreign trial sites that year, the FDA inspected only forty-five — less than one percent.”

IPS Examines Medical Research Regulations In Light Of 1940s Guatemala Experiments

Inter Press Service examines regulations related to human medical research, writing that “experiments carried out by U.S. doctors in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948 using 1,300 human subjects who were infected with sexually transmitted diseases highlighted the inadequacy of controls and safeguards in clinical testing in this Central American country — still a major problem today, according to experts.”

Family Planning, Contraceptives A National Priority For Saving Women's Lives, U.N. Meeting Participants Say

First ladies, health and finance ministers, and parliamentarians from 12 developing countries participating in the U.N. Population Fund’s (UNFPA) Global Programme to Enhance Reproductive Health Commodity Security, which was launched in 2007, declared at a U.N. meeting held on Wednesday that “voluntary family planning, secured by a steady supply of contraceptives, is a national priority for saving women’s lives,” the U.N. News Centre reports. “More than 215 million women in developing countries want to avoid or space pregnancies but are not using modern methods of contraception, according to the UNFPA,” the news service writes.

Chagas Parasite Infects 18M Worldwide, Often Without Detection

Chagas, which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, affects 18 million people worldwide, but is particularly prevalent in Latin American countries, “where a bug called the vinchuga, sometimes known as the kissing bug (because it bites people on their faces while they sleep), transmits the disease,” the Atlantic reports. The parasite “remains dormant in peoples’ bodies for up to 30 years, until it kills them suddenly by stopping their hearts or rupturing their intestines,” the magazine writes.

World Water Week Seminar Examined Integrating Water And Health Initiatives

In this “End The Neglect” blog post, Ann Kelly, representative of the Howard G. Buffett Foundation’s Global Water Initiative and co-founder of Partner at Global Philanthropy Group, provides an overview of a Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases co-hosted seminar at World Water Week in Stockholm, Sweden. Kelly writes of “a…

Researchers Turn Their Attention To Chagas Disease As Developed Countries See Rise In Infection Rates

Chagas disease, a historically neglected tropical disease that the WHO estimates affects about 10 million people worldwide, is drawing increased attention as infection by the parasite spreads from Latin America to developed countries, such as Spain and the United States, Science reports. “The main reason for this rise isn’t the spread of insects carrying Trypanosoma cruzi but rather emigration from Latin America of large numbers of people who are already infected,” the magazine writes.

U.S. Research Collaboration Addresses Threat Of Cancer In Latin America

In a post in the State Department’s “DipNote” blog, Krysten Carrera, a Presidential Management fellow at the National Cancer Institute currently serving in the Bureau of International Organization Affairs, discusses “the growing international effort to address the threat of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs).” She highlights the United States-Latin America Cancer Research Network…