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Nigerian Nursing, Midwifery College Seeks To Train Local Health Care Workers

BBC News reports on a $15 million college in northern Nigeria’s Jigawa state that is working to train nurses and midwives. The first class of the three-year program is expected to graduate in September, and “[t]he hope is these new nurses and midwives will stay in Jigawa’s villages once their training is complete, rather than drifting to towns and cities where the work is usually better paid,” BBC notes, adding, “The college represents a start in addressing what has been a gaping lack of resources.” Four years ago, there were 14 midwives trying to serve “the state’s population of 4.5 million people” and “cover more than 600 small health centers,” BBC continues. However, a British-funded project called Paths 2, which aims “to reduce the state’s high level of preventable deaths among pregnant women,” has helped facilitate the creation of training programs for local health care workers, the news service notes (Dreaper, 8/2).

New York Times Blog Examines Gap In Surgical Care In Developing World

In this post in the New York Times’ “Opinionator” blog, journalist Sarika Bansal reports on a gap in surgical care in developing countries, writing, “It is conservatively estimated that 56 million people in sub-Saharan Africa — over twice the number living with HIV/AIDS — need a surgery today,” but, “across the developing world, surgical care often does not reach those who need it.” She says that a lack of access to surgical facilities and equipment, as well as a lack of trained health care workers, especially in rural areas, contributes to the problem. “Instead of finding ways to lure surgeons to rural areas” to fill this gap, many African countries, including Zambia, Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique and Ethiopia, “have started experimenting with ‘task shifting’ — that is, training non-physicians to do the basic work of surgeons,” she notes. She highlights a medical licentiate program in Zambia that “trains clinical officers in basic surgeries like hernia repairs, bowel obstruction surgery, hysterectomies and more,” as well as “the donor-funded FlySpec (Flying Specialist) program, which charters planes to conduct orthopedic surgeries in remote parts of the country” (8/8).

Maternal Healthcare Providers In Developing World Must Be Trained To Show Respect, Compassion

“In teaching nurses and midwives in the developing world to care for their patients, a core tenet is that respectful care is quality care,” Catherine Carr, senior maternal health advisor for the Jhpiego/MCHIP-Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program, writes in this post in Huffington Post’s “Global Motherhood” blog. “Around the globe, health-care workers are being trained in respectful, humanized care, because all patients, regardless of economic status or geographic location, deserve to be treated with reverence and consideration,” she continues, adding, “Unfortunately, there is still a huge gap between the maternal care a pregnant woman should receive and what she actually experiences.”

IRIN Examines Expected Surge Of Doctors In Ethiopia

“Ethiopia is preparing for a flood of medical doctors within ‘three to four years,’ an influx meant to save a public health system that has been losing doctors and specialists to internal and external migration,” IRIN reports. “‘We are now implementing strategies that intend to increase the current below-World Health Organization [WHO] standard number of medical doctors and retaining them in public hospitals,’ Tedros Adhanom, Ethiopia’s minister of health, told IRIN,” the news service writes. “‘We have now reached an enrollment rate of more than 3,100,’ [Adhanom] said,” adding, “The rate of enrollment in the country’s medical schools has increased tenfold from 2005, when it was below 300,” according to the news service.

Syrians In Urgent Need Of Life-Saving Medicines As Fighting Escalates, WHO Warns

“Syrians are in urgent need of life-saving medicines following an escalation in fighting, which also threatens further food shortages, U.N. agencies warned on Tuesday,” Agence France-Presse reports (8/7). “Drugs for tuberculosis, hepatitis, hypertension, diabetes and cancer are urgently needed, as well as hemodialysis for kidney diseases, according to the WHO,” Reuters notes (8/7). “‘The recent escalation of clashes had resulted in substantial damages to the pharmaceutical plants located in rural Aleppo, Homs and Rural Damascus, where 90 percent of the country’s plants were located,’ a WHO spokesperson, Tarik Jasarevic, told reporters in Geneva today,” the U.N. News Centre writes. “Prior to the violence which has wracked the Middle Eastern country, Syria produced 90 percent of its medicines and drugs locally,” the news service notes (8/7).

Health Workers Feeling Effects Of Staff, Supply Shortages At Clinics In Southwestern Uganda

Health workers with Medical Teams International, a medical non-governmental organization, “say they are overwhelmed” by high demand at five health clinics in two southwestern Ugandan refugee centers, PlusNews reports. The refugees, “many of whom came from conflict-prone areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC),” and local residents are in need of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) prevention information, and care and treatment services, according to the news service. “Uganda suffers from a chronic shortage of health workers — less than half of the vacant health positions are filled — but the recent influx of refugees fleeing violence in neighboring DRC has put even more pressure on [the region’s] health services,” PlusNews writes. Physicians, who see 30 to 50 patients daily and often work double shifts, say gaps in the supplies of antiretroviral (ARV) and TB drugs poses concern, as does trying to follow-up with patients who may not return for visits, the news service notes (3/29).

Kenya, Tanzania Face Ongoing Health Worker Strikes

About 2,000 Kenyan health workers attended a demonstration outside the Ministry of Health on Friday, the Associated Press/Seattle Times reports, noting, “Some 40,000 health workers nationwide went on strike on March 1 to protest low pay and poor working conditions.” According to the news service, “[t]he government announced Thursday that it fired 25,000 workers who defied an order to return to work” (3/9). “Anyang Nyong’o, minister for medical services, said on Thursday that the sacked workers would be required to re-apply if they are to be considered for reappointment,” MWC News notes (3/9).

Polio Vaccination Campaign In Darfur Shows Immunizations Possible In 'Emergency And Conflict Settings'

In an Inter Press Service opinion piece, Siddharth Chatterjee, chief diplomat and head of strategic partnerships at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, and Sam Agbo, an independent public health adviser in the U.K., write about the unstable situation in Darfur, Sudan, in 2004, and how “UNICEF and WHO in Sudan along with important NGO partners started planning with local authorities on how best to immunize all children in Darfur.” They outline the major challenges, including staff safety, and discuss how multi-agency teams were able to vaccinate 10,000 children in two immunization rounds. Chatterjee and Agbo add, “The polio immunization campaign was the driver for a wider process of improving and ramping up assistance to communities and this made the campaign attractive to mothers to bring their children to the immunization hubs that were established.”

Female Health Care Volunteers In Nepal Helping To Improve Maternal, Neonatal Survival Rates

“Women working as female health care volunteers [FHCVs] often provide a vital service for the poorest in mountainous Nepal, and have contributed to a steady improvement in maternal and neonatal survival rates,” IRIN reports. In Nepal, 52,000 FHCVs work nationwide, often in remote regions, to refer women and children to health centers and help raise money for their trips, according to the news service. Many experts believe the FHCVs have played a key role in reducing Nepal’s maternal mortality ratio and increasing the proportion of births attended by a skilled birth attendant or that take place in a health facility, IRIN notes. “The FCHV program was launched in 1988 in 19 districts in the mid-west (Nepal’s poorest region), with the purpose of improving maternal and neonatal care, according to the Health Ministry,” IRIN writes, adding, “Despite being regarded as key to the state’s public health program, the government provides them with virtually no support” (10/5).

New York Times Blog Features Interview With Indian Polio Expert

To mark World Polio Day, the New York Times’ “India Ink” blog features an interview with Naveen Thacker, a member of the team that led India’s polio eradication efforts. The country has not recorded a new case of polio since January 2011 and is in line to be declared polio-free in January 2014 if no new cases occur, according to the blog. Thacker said “strong leadership and political support at every level of government,” including public-private partnerships, were critical to eradication efforts, the blog notes. “To remain polio-free we must ensure the maintenance of our highly sensitive surveillance system, so that we can detect outbreaks early, and we must also sustain high levels of polio immunization through routine immunization,” Thacker said, adding, “Globally, we’ve made amazing progress, but 99 percent reduction in polio cases isn’t good enough. We need to finish the job,” according to the blog (Raina, 10/24).

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