Disease Diagnosis/Detection

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Yellow Fever Kills 164 In Sudan’s Darfur; Agencies Working To Vaccinate People In Region

“Yellow fever has killed 164 people over the last three months in Sudan’s Darfur, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday,” Reuters reports. According to a joint statement, “Between 2 September and 29 November, the total number of suspected yellow fever cases has reached 677, including 164 deaths,” the news agency writes. Aid agencies provide almost all available health care in Darfur, “where rebels took up arms in 2003 complaining of neglect by the central government,” according to Reuters. Sudan’s health ministry and the WHO have vaccinated more than half of a targeted 3.6 million people in the region for the disease, the news agency notes (Dziadosz, 12/3).

Recent Releases In Global Health

Scientific American Examines Neglected Tropical Diseases A Scientific American article examines recent efforts to tackle neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The author writes “NTDs have plagued humankind for thousands of years. … What is new, however, is that donors, drugmakers, health ministries in low- and middle-income countries, the World Health Organization…

Also In Global Health News: UK’s Global TB Control Program; Yellow Vaccine Scarcity In Uganda; Rats Detecting TB; Volunteer Health Workers In Afghanistan; Cuba’s Health System

Paper Criticizes UK’s Global Approach To TB Control A paper published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine highlights concern about the U.K. Department of International Development’s (DfID) global tuberculosis control strategy, the Guardian reports. “Bruce Currey, Professor Quazi Quamruzzaman and Professor Mahmuder Rahman, all based at Dhaka Community…

Lancet World Report Examines Health Risks Associated With Inaccurate TB Tests, WHO’s Upcoming Recommendations

With “scores of commercial serology tests for tuberculosis … being sold in high-burden countries,” the “WHO is due to release a negative policy recommendation – the first of its kind for the organisation” – after several reviews have “indicated poor performance of these tests,” Lancet World Report writes in a piece that documents the health risks associated with a growing number of inaccurate TB tests. However, “[m]anufacturers continue to claim that their tests are effective and fill a diagnostic niche, especially in sputum smear-negative patient groups,” the journal notes.

Also In Global Health News: Zimbabwe’s HIV Prevalence Declines; Sri Lanka Flooding; Online Tool To Track Outbreaks; U.S. Recognition Of S. Sudan; TB In Swaziland

Study Examines Reasons For Zimbabwe’s HIV Prevalence Decline Reuters reports that an article published in PLoS Medicine “said Zimbabwe’s [HIV] epidemic was one of the biggest in the world until the [prevalence of people] infected with HIV almost halved, from 29 percent of the population in 1997 to 16 percent in 2007.”…

Recent Releases In Global Health

The Future Of Global Health Journalism: This report for the Kaiser Family Foundation found that shrinking newsroom budgets and the closing of many foreign bureaus are curtailing global health coverage within traditional news media outlets. Advocacy and nongovernmental organizations are increasingly bypassing news outlets and producing their own content, leading to questions…

Recent Releases In Global Health

Lancet Infectious Diseases Editorial Reflects On Need To Integrate HIV/AIDS, TB Prevention, Treatment Services Ahead of the International AIDS Conference, held July 18-23 in Vienna, Austria, a Lancet Infectious Diseases editorial notes, “While there has been welcome progress in making ART available, HIV/AIDS raises other challenges that we are only…