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Low-Level Radiation From Japan’s Damaged Nuclear Plant Detected As Far Away As U.S.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Monday said U.S. government sensors had detected radiation believed to be from the damaged nuclear plant, Reuters writes. But those levels are significantly lower than what is considered dangerous for people, according to the agency. “The EPA said 12 air monitoring locations across the country have identified trace amounts of radioactive isotopes believed to have come from Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear plant hit by an earthquake and tsunami on March 11,” the news service reports. In a press release, the EPA said, “These types of findings are to be expected in the coming days and are still far below levels of public health concern” (Gardner, 3/28).

Recent Releases In Global Health

Main Take-Aways From GHME: Reflections on last week’s Global Health Metrics & Evaluation (GHME) conference in Seattle, Washington appeared in several blogs and a Lancet column: Lancet: Offline: Where was Europe? (Horton, 3/26) Karen Grepin’s “Global Health Blog”: A trip to the inside of the Global Health Sausage Factory (3/22)…

Opinions: Counterfeit Medicines; Oral Rehydration Therapy; Increasing Access To Safe Drinking Water; Attracting R&D For Health Issues In Latin America

U.S. Must Lead In Global Fight Against Counterfeit Medicines “[T]he Obama administration and Congress should continue efforts to strengthen the safety of America’s drug supply and, simultaneously, coordinate a global response to the problem of counterfeit drugs,” Thomas Kubic, president & CEO of the Pharmaceutical Security Institute and a former…

Also In Global Health News: Semi-Synthetic Artemisinin Development; Libyan Humanitarian Situation; Netherlands Possibly Scaling Back Recipients Of Development Aid; African Lab Society Launched; Maternal Mortality In Bangladesh

Scientists Refine Efforts To Develop Semi-Synthetic Artemisinin PostMedia News/Vancouver Sun reports on recent advances by researchers to speed the development of semi-synthetic artemisinin to treat people with malaria. Though artemisinin is currently derived “from the sweet wormwood plant found in parts of Asia and Africa … cultivating and harvesting the…

Also In Global Health News: Cholera In Haiti; Treating Recurring TB; Preventing Malaria Deaths; Cash Incentives For Women in Africa; Traditional Birth Attendants In Malawi; PMTCT In Namibia

Cholera Epidemic In Haiti Could Affect Twice As Many As Previously Estimated The cholera epidemic in post-quake Haiti could affect as many as 800,000 people and kill 11,000 by December, twice the number the U.N. estimated would be affected, according to a study published in The Lancet, National Journal reports.…

Also In Global Health News: Political Uprisings Could Help Arab Women; Parents Of HIV-Positive Libyan Children Speak; Scientific Commission For Global Food Security; Laura Bush On Foreign Aid Cuts; FDA Approves HIV/AIDS Drug For Kids

Political Uprisings in North Africa Could Help Women Gain Political, Economic Rights Bloomberg News/Boston Globe examines how the recent political uprisings in Egypt and neighboring countries could lead to new opportunities for women in the region. The article describes the challenges Arab women in the countries face, as documented in…

Recent Releases In Global Health

The following is a sampling of blog posts published this week marking International Women’s Day : PEPFAR’s Gender Challenge Fund:  At the Intersection of Gender and HIV (Goosby, 3/11). A Conversation in Afghanistan: Perspectives on International Women’s Day (Ehsaas, 3/9). The Best Investment in Global Women’s Health (Sturchio/Barnes, 3/8). Why…

Opinions: Investing In Science, Technolgy; Indian Public-Private Partnership For NTDs; U.S. Global Food Security Investments; Clinton’s Statements On PEPFAR; U.S. Foreign Aid; Primary Care

Investments In Science, Technology Improve Health, Make Economic Sense “Now is the time to support science and technology – especially in difficult economic times. It is the right thing to do, and it makes good economic sense,” Alex Dehgan, science and technology adviser to the USAID administrator, and Kaitlin Christenson,…