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Also In Global Health News: Cholera Death In DR; TB Vaccine Study; Rising Food Prices

Dominican Republic Reports Country’s First Cholera Death Following Outbreak In Haiti “Dominican Republic on Sunday confirmed that a 53-year-old Haitian man has become the country’s first death from cholera and announced the immediate start of a broad disease control and monitoring operation” around the eastern town of Higuey where he…

Recent Releases In Global Health

Insecticides To Fight Malaria: In a Daily Caller opinion piece, Richard Tren of Africa Fighting Malaria and Donald Roberts of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences write in support of using insecticides, like DDT, to combat malaria: “Unless the donor nations that fund global malaria programs, such as the…

Researchers Look At Potential Benefits, Risks Of Exclusive Breastfeeding During First 6 Months Of Life

A review of existing studies on breastfeeding, published Thursday online in BMJ (British Medical Journal), suggests some findings that contradict the WHO’s 2001 recommendation that mothers “exclusively breastfeed for the first six months of their infants’ lives,” Nature News reports (Gilbert, 1/14). Researchers who conducted the most recent review “said babies fed only breast milk could suffer iron deficiency and may be more prone to allergies” and they said mothers could stop breastfeeding as early as four months, Agence France-Presse writes.

Also In Global Health News: Afghanistan’s Foreign Aid Tax; Polio In Pakistan; Rape In Conflicts; ARV Combination During Breastfeeding; Ecuador’s Health System; GlobalPost Looks At State Of Mandela’s Home Village

Afghan Government Begins Taxing U.S. Contractors The Washington Post reports on Afghanistan’s efforts “to tax U.S. contractors operating there.” Though it “could raise millions for the cash-strapped government,” U.S. and Afghan officials say the tax “could also provoke fresh confrontation with the United States,” the newspaper writes. “Taxation of U.S. government assistance is barred…

RTS,S Offers 46 Percent Protection Against Malaria For At Least 15 Months After Vaccination, Study Finds

A Phase II trial published Friday in Lancet Infectious Diseases has shown that RTS,S, the “experimental malaria vaccine from GlaxoSmithKline provides African children with long-lasting protection” against malaria, Reuters reports. “Scientists conducting the mid-stage trial at the Kenya Medical Research Institute said results showing the shot offered 46 percent protection for 15 months meant it had ‘promise as a potential public health intervention against childhood malaria in malaria endemic countries’,” the news service notes (Kelland, 1/14).

Recent Releases

‘Ethical Issues Raised By PrEP Are Difficult, But Not Insurmountable’: “The AIDS movement is at a pivotal point in history, where it will face scrutiny not only to demonstrate that interventions are cost-effective and equitably distributed, but also to balance resource demands with other global health imperatives, such as maternal/child…

News Outlets Examine Reaction To WHO Plan To Contain Drug-Resistant Malaria

In follow-up coverage of the WHO’s announcement Wednesday of a plan to contain the spread of artemisinin-resistant malaria, news outlets examined the scope of the problem, reactions to the plan and speculations by some of how the anticipated $175 million annual cost would be funded.

Also In Global Health News: U.S. Aid In Afghanistan; USAID Program To Improve Kenya’s Health Services; Diabetes In Middle East, North Africa; Regrets Over ‘New Delhi’ Superbug; Cholera In PNG

McClatchy Examines Ineffected U.S. Aid In Afghanistan McClatchy news service reports that “[i]n the rush to rebuild Afghanistan, the U.S. government has charged ahead with ever-expanding development programs despite questions about their impact, cost and value to America’s multi-billion-dollar campaign to shore up the pro-Western Afghan president and prevent Taliban insurgents…

Antibodies Produced By People Who Recovered From H1N1 Offer Clues For Universal Flu Vaccine

The antibodies produced by individuals who fought off H1N1 (swine flu) infection last year may bring researchers one step closer to their quest to develop a “universal” flu vaccine, U.S. researchers said Monday, HealthDay News/Bloomberg Businessweek reports. As the researchers from Emory University and the University of Chicago report in the Jan. 10 issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine, “people who were infected with the H1N1 virus and recovered had a special immune response, producing antibodies that protect against a wide variety of flu strains,” the news service writes (1/10).