Does The Public Want To Get A COVID-19 Vaccine? When?

An ongoing research project tracking the public’s attitudes and experiences with COVID-19 vaccinations.

Intentions
  • Increase In COVID-19 Vaccine Enthusiasm Slows Across Racial And Ethnic Groups

  • Democrats Remain Most Enthusiastic About COVID-19 Vaccine

Messengers
Target Population Groups
  • Confidence That The Vaccines Were Adequately Tested Among Their Race And Ethnic Groups Is Related To Vaccine Intentions

    Confidence in adequate testing among one’s own racial or ethnic group is related to vaccine intentions and enthusiasm among Black and Hispanic adults. Those who are at least somewhat confident that the vaccines have been adequately tested for safety and effectiveness among their own racial or ethnic group are about twice as likely to say they’ve already been vaccinated or want the vaccine as soon as they can get it compared to those who are not confident (58% vs. 24% among Black adults, 63% vs. 30% among Hispanic adults).

  • More Than A Third Of Those In "Wait And See" Plan To Get COVID-19 Vaccine Within Three Months, But Another Third Will Wait Over A Year

    While few who are eager remain unvaccinated, the Monitor does provide some indication that vaccination rates could continue to increase over the next few months. In addition to the remaining 4% of all adults who say they have not been vaccinated but plan to do so as soon as they can, about a third of those in the “wait and see” group (4% of all adults) say they either already have a vaccine appointment scheduled or that they will wait 3 months or less before getting vaccinated, suggesting the possibility that the adult vaccination rate could surpass 70% this summer. Still, over four in ten of those in the “wait and see” group say they intend to wait more than 6 months to get a vaccine, including one third who plan to wait more than a year.

Concerns or Barriers
messages and information
  • More Than Half Of The Public Believe Or Are Unsure About Some Common COVID-19 Vaccine Myths

    The April KFF Vaccine Monitor finds that a majority of adults (54%) either believe some common misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccines or are unsure whether these things are true or false. About one in four believe or are unsure whether you can get COVID-19 from the vaccine and one in five believe or are unsure whether those who have already had COVID-19 should not get vaccinated, whether the vaccines contain fetal cells, have been shown to cause infertility, or that the vaccine can change your DNA. Among younger adults ages 18 to 29, four in ten (42%) say they have heard that the COVID-19 has been shown to cause infertility, and about one in four either are unsure if that is true (22%) or believe that is true (5%).

  • Majorities Of Women, Independents, Republicans And Younger Adults Believe Or Are Unsure About At Least One Myth About The Vaccine

    A larger share of women (58%) than men (50%) believe or be unsure about at least one common myth surrounding the COVID-19 vaccine. Likewise, younger adults are more likely than those 65 and older to believe or be unsure about a vaccine myth. Across partisans, majorities of Republicans (58%) and independents (56%) believe or are unsure about at least one vaccine myth, compared to a smaller share of Democrats (43%).

experiences
  • Doctor's Offices, Pharmacies Top Locations Where People Would Prefer To Get COVID-19 Vaccine

    With COVID-19 vaccines increasingly becoming available at different locations across the U.S., we examined which locations people say they’d be willing to visit to get a COVID-19 vaccine, as well as the locations they would most prefer as vaccination sites. Individual doctor’s offices were at the top of both lists, but a range of locations were acceptable and preferred by different individuals

  • Growing Share Says They Have Enough Information About Where And When They Can Get Vaccinated

    The share of unvaccinated adults who say they have enough information about when they will be able to get the COVID-19 vaccine increased from 53% in March to 69% in April, and the share who say they know enough about where they can get a vaccine increased from 67% to 78%. Still, that leaves one in five unvaccinated adults overall who say they don’t have enough information about where to get a COVID-19 vaccine and 26% who say they don’t have enough information about when they can get one.

 

KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor is an ongoing research project tracking the public’s attitudes and experiences with COVID-19 vaccinations. Using a combination of surveys and qualitative research, the Monitor tracks the dynamic nature of public opinion as vaccine development and distribution unfold, including vaccine confidence and acceptance, information needs, trusted messengers and messages, as well as the public’s experiences with vaccination. A list of all Vaccine Monitor reports is available here.

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Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco, California.