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NGO Engagement in U.S. Global Health Efforts: U.S.-Based NGOs Receiving USG Support Through USAID

Executive Summary
  1. Based on Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of data from the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard (www.ForeignAssistance.gov).

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  2. Other Public Health Threats also addresses dangers posed by infectious diseases not included elsewhere, such as cholera, dengue, and meningitis; significant non-communicable health threats of major public health importance; the containment of antimicrobial resistance; and the crosscutting work on surveillance that builds capacity for outbreak preparedness and response. According to USAID congressional budget justifications, http://www.usaid.gov/results-and-data/budget-spending/congressional-budget-justification.

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  3. Pandemic Influenza and Other Emerging Threats includes efforts to mitigate the possibility that a highly virulent virus could develop into a pandemic by strengthening targeted countries’ ability to detect cases early and to apply appropriate control measures quickly. According to USAID congressional budget justifications, http://www.usaid.gov/results-and-data/budget-spending/congressional-budget-justification.

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Report
  1. For example, USAID transaction data analyzed for this report include funds transferred from the Department of State to USAID for HIV efforts, which were then obligated and eventually disbursed to U.S.-based NGOs.

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  2. Based on Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of data from the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard (www.ForeignAssistance.gov).

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  3. PVOs are a subset of the wider NGO community and “are tax-exempt nonprofits that leverage their expertise and private funding to address development challenges abroad.” USAID, “PVO Registration,” webpage, http://www.usaid.gov/pvo.

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  4. Numerous U.S.-based NGOs carrying out global health efforts do not receive USG support for their efforts. For some, this is a conscious choice to not accept government funding, while others’ global health activities, priorities, and/or approaches may not lend themselves to being funded by the USG for any number of reasons. Some examples of U.S.-based NGOs engaged in global health activities that fall into this category include the Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE), Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) USA, Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the Mennonite Central Committee U.S., the ONE Campaign, and Oxfam America.

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  5. The 20 faith-based NGOs are Adventist Development and Relief Agency, Catholic Medical Missions Board, Catholic Relief Services, Cross International, Episcopal Relief & Development, Feed the Children, HOPE worldwide, International Orthodox Christian Charities, Lifewater International, Lutheran World Relief, Medical Teams International, Mennonite Economic Development Associates, Nazarene Compassionate Ministries, Samaritan's Purse, World Concern, World Hope International, World Relief, World Renew, World Vision, and YMCA. It is important to note, however, that other organizations may identify as secular but have religious principles undergirding their work. For example, the work of the Aga Khan Foundation (part of the Aga Khan Development Network, AKDN) “is underpinned by the ethical principles of Islam – particularly consultation, solidarity with those less fortunate, self-reliance and human dignity – but AKDN does not restrict its work to a particular community, country or region.” AKDN, “Press Centre: Frequent Questions,” webpage, http://www.akdn.org/faq.asp.

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  6. The other relevant bureaus are: the Bureau for Asia; Bureau for Europe and Eurasia; Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean; Bureau for the Middle East; Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan Affairs; Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance; Bureau for Food Security; Bureau for Economic Growth, Education and Environment (previously known as the Bureau for Economic Growth and Trade (EGAT)); and U.S. Global Development Lab  (incorporates the former Office of Innovation and Development Alliances (IDEA) and Office of Development Partners (ODP)). Additionally, a very small amount of funding was designated for the “Recovery” organizational unit.

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  7. Pandemic Influenza and Other Emerging Threats includes efforts to mitigate the possibility that a highly virulent virus could develop into a pandemic by strengthening targeted countries’ ability to detect cases early and to apply appropriate control measures quickly. According to USAID congressional budget justifications,http://www.usaid.gov/results-and-data/budget-spending/congressional-budget-justification.

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  8. Other Public Health Threats also addresses dangers posed by infectious diseases not included elsewhere, such as cholera, dengue, and meningitis; significant non-communicable health threats of major public health importance; the containment of antimicrobial resistance; and the crosscutting work on surveillance that builds capacity for outbreak preparedness and response. According to USAID congressional budget justifications,http://www.usaid.gov/results-and-data/budget-spending/congressional-budget-justification.

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  9. In addition to “worldwide” support, regions/sub-regions mentioned in the data sources included: Africa, East Africa, West Africa, South Africa, Asia, Central Asia, East Asia, Eurasia, the Middle East, Latin America & the Caribbean, Central America, and South America.

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  10. In addition to the countries listed below, other countries may have been reached through regional efforts. Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, China, Congo (Republic of), Cote d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, DR Congo, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan*, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, West Bank and Gaza, Yemen, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. *Some data entries state “Sudan, Pre-2011 Election”, which refers to the 2011 election that led to the division of Sudan into two countries, one of which is South Sudan; USG efforts have historically targeted this area.

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  11. Although a defunct organization whose activities were mostly taken over by FHI Development 360, the Academy for Education Development (AED) appears in FY 2013 transaction data and is, therefore, included in this analysis and the related figures.

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Appendices
  1. For example, USAID transaction data analyzed for this report include funds transferred from the Department of State to USAID for HIV efforts, which were then obligated and eventually disbursed to U.S.-based NGOs.

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  2. Based on Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of data from the U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard (www.ForeignAssistance.gov).

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  3. Positive and negative disbursements along with zero-dollar disbursements that are no-cost extensions) are each closely linked to the recent completion or ongoing execution of global health activities, providing the best approximation available for showing where work is being done.

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Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization based in Menlo Park, California.